We use cookies on whatcar.com to improve your browsing experience and to provide you with relevant content and advertising, by continuing to use our site you agree to this. Please see our privacy policy for more details. Continue

Crackdown on rogue traders

10 June 2005

Residential streets and roads around the UK could be cleared of abandoned or broken-down vehicles and cars for sale, under new environmental laws that come into force this week

Abandoned vehicles can now be removed immediately

Residential streets and roads around the UK could be cleared of abandoned or broken-down vehicles and cars for sale, under new environmental laws that come into force this week

The Clean Neighbourhood and Environment Act gives local authorities the power to clamp down on traders who sell and repair vehicles at the roadside.

Under the new Act, it is now an offence to park two or more vehicles on the same road which are advertised for sale as part of a commercial business. It is also illegal to repair vehicles on the road as a business activity – although this measure does not affect legitimate roadside recovery services.

Local authorities can choose whether to prosecute offenders through the courts or issue a fixed penalty notice of £100, depending on the severity of the case.

Mike Owen, spokesman for the Retail Motor Industry Federation (RMI) welcomed the crackdown, saying: ‘The rules will curb the activities of rogue traders that operate without proper facilities or procedures. Many of these sell and repair vehicles on the road, and bring the whole sector into disrepute.’

The Act also gives councils the right to remove abandoned vehicles from public roads immediately. In the past, vehicles had to be tagged with a 24-hour removal notice before they could be towed away, but this has been criticised for encouraging arson. Now, when a local authority is alerted to the fact that a car has not moved for some time, is untaxed or appears abandoned, they can act straightaway.

A spokesman for the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), told Whatcar.com: ‘These measures have arisen from growing concern among councils and the public about the number of nuisance vehicles on our roads. Abandoned cars are unsightly, dangerous and polluting, while consumers are at risk from illegitimate sales and repair business operating at the roadside.’

Haymarket Logo What Car? is brought to you by Haymarket Consumer Media
What Car? is part of Haymarket Motoring
© Haymarket Media Group 2014