Our cars: Jaguar XF - May

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Jaguar XF
Jaguar XF
Jaguar XF 2.2D Luxury

Week ending May 18
Mileage 19,300
Driven this week: 600


Jaguar XF review

So, as reported last week, the Jag’s developed a steering wobble under braking, and there’s a pronounced thump from the fuel tank in stop-start traffic when the tank’s around half full.

The car was booked into Grange Jaguar Swindon (0844 875 3188) for investigation. I turned up at the appointed hour and was promptly handed the keys to an XF 3.0D V6 Premium Luxury as a courtesy car.

Later that day, I got a call to say that the front brake discs had needed to be replaced under warranty because one of them had warped. The brake pads were also 75% worn, so have also been replaced, which I would have to pay for. Fair enough.

Unfortunately, the fuel tank noise is ‘a known issue on all XFs’, according to the staff. For some reason it’s less apparent in 3.0-litre models, but there’s no fix for the issue, which is extremely disappointing.

Still, the courtesy car I was given demonstrated just how good the 3.0-litre model still is, and why it’s still the pick of the range. It was smoother, quieter and rode more comfortably than my car. However, it was also thristier, and being a pre-facelift car, didn’t look nearly as good as my one.

Euan.Doig@whatcar.com

Euan's Jaguar XF on video


Week ending May 18
Mileage 19,300
Driven this week: 600


Houston, we have a wobble. The Jag has developed a noticeable vibration through the steering under braking. I do a lot of miles on the motorway, so any stops tend to be from high speed, which is exacerbating the issue.

I’m also becoming ever-more aware of a pronounced ‘thump’ from the fuel tank area when I’m in stop-start traffic. It’s as if the fuel is sloshing back and forth uncontrollably. Has anyone else noticed this issue?

The car’s booked in for an investigation.

Euan.Doig@whatcar.com

Euan.Doig@whatcar.com

Week ending May 11
Mileage 18,700
Driven this week 400 miles


I've always been a fan of the XF's styling, ever since we first tested the car in December 2007. The car's metalwork is truly stunning, without a bad angle on it.

I became even more of a fan when the car was face-lifted last year; the tweak removed any slight gawkiness around the headlights, to my eyes.
However, I'm not such a fan of the latest rear lights on the XF, which have a whiff of 1970s American diner neon sign about them.

Am I alone in this?

Week ending April 27
Mileage 18,300
Driven this week: 1000 miles


The What Car? production schedule is not a flexible thing – if there’s a deadline approaching, you keep going until the work is done. It’s just what you have to do. I’m not complaining, because I love it.

However, it does tend to make for the odd late night or two, and often when I get home it’s dark, which is where the benefit of one of the Jag’s features becomes immediately and endearingly obvious – it has some of the brightest reversing lights I’ve come across.

They make it easy to see what’s behind, and even light up the kerb so it’s easy to avoid any painful wheel-scraping incidents. They’re so bright that it’s actually painful to look at them directly even during the day!

I reckon they’re a major reason why the Jag’s wheels and bumpers remain blemish-free.

It’s simple touches like this that make living with a car easy.

Euan.Doig@whatcar.com

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Our cars: Jaguar XF - April 2012

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