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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For It has a cracking engine range backed up by agile handling and distinctive good looks

Against The ride becomes choppy on bumpy roads, and the rear seats are only for children

Verdict It's a good-looking Italian coupe, but overshadowed by the prettier Brera

Go for… 1.9 JTD

Avoid… 3.2 V6

Alfa Romeo GT Coupe
  • 1. The driving position is suitable for most, although taller drivers may struggle to make themselves comfortable
  • 2. The front undertray is prone to grounding out as you drive over speed bumps
  • 3. Look for scuffs on the backs of the front seats
  • 4. All GTs wear their front tyres quickly, so budget for this
  • 5. 1.9 JTD diesel is the engine of choice - it'll average over 40mpg
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Alfa Romeo GT Coupe full review with expert trade views

Based on the same platform as the Alfa 156 saloon, the GT's agile chassis is entertaining and keen drivers will love driving the car hard, but only if the road is smooth. If you encounter bumps or lumps, the front wheels can begin to scrabble for grip.

The 1.9 JTD turbodiesel suits the GT very well, as does the 2.0 JTS petrol. The great-sounding 3.2 V6 is quick, but has too much power for the GT's chassis.

The superb feeling through the steering is one of the GT's finest assets, but in tight corners, it's all too easy for the strong engines to spin a front wheel, bringing the traction control into play.

There's only one trim level on the GT and it includes plenty of equipment. The driving position is suitable for most, although taller drivers may struggle to make themselves comfortable. Space in the rear is too cramped for adults on longer trips.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Rare and quite desirable but 2.0 best avoided. Values strong for an Alfa

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

A diesel engine may sound at odds with the image of a svelte coupe like the GT, but the 1.9 JTD is the pick of the engines available in this handsome car. With 150bhp and 225lb ft of pull, the JTD model gives little away in performance to the petrol-powered 2.0 JTS version, while managing a very respectable 42.2mpg combined consumption.

As all GTs share the same trim level and equipment, just about the only decision you have to make is what engine to have. If you don't fancy the diesel, the 2.0 JTS is a good bet, as it happily zings away when asked to perform, yet won't break the bank on economy.

Use the full potential of the 3.2 V6 and its 240bhp, and you'll soon see hefty fuel bills, although some may think that's a small price to pay for the splendid noise the V6 makes.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Smaller 2.0 JTS and 1.9 JTDM look like value

James Ruppert
Used car guru

Alfa Romeo dealers are not as expensive for servicing as many of their rivals, but the service can still be patchy. The best bet is to find a friendly dealer and stick with them, or seek out one of the many independent Alfa specialists who are fanatical about the company and its cars.

The JTD turbodiesel engine easily returns more than 40mpg in normal driving, so is easiest on the wallet. The 2.0 JTS is also decently frugal, but the 3.2 V6 pays for its performance at the fuel pumps, as well as having markedly more expensive routine maintenance costs.

Another plus point for the turbodiesel model is its lower insurance cost compared to the petrol models.

All GTs wear their front tyres quite quickly, so you can expect to have buy a new pair once a year or around every 10,000 miles.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Rare and quite desirable but 2.0 best avoided. Values strong for an Alfa

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

There are no reports of major problems with the engines or suspension yet, but the front undertray is prone to grounding as you drive over speed bumps, which is a legacy of the 156 platform. You need to look underneath to make sure there are no nasty scrapes from a heavy hit.

The electrics can cause a few headaches, too, but they tend to be minor irritations.

The cabin probably won't stay rattle-free for long. Look for scuffs on the backs of the front seats if the rear seats have been used to carry passengers. Any damage here can be expensive to repair.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Smaller 2.0 JTS and 1.9 JTDM look like value

James Ruppert
Used car guru
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