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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For Off-road ability and superior build quality make the Q7 a pedigree 4x4

Against The Audi's ride is too firm at lower speeds and the third row of seats is cramped for adults

Verdict The Q7 is expensive to run, but it has a great image and is very capable.

Go for… 3.0 TDI SE

Avoid… 6.0 V12 TDI

Audi Q7 4x4
  • 1. The Q7 is better-suited to on-road driving, but the air suspension system can raise and lower the ride height as required for any off-road antics.
  • 2. The cabin is spacious and the first two rows of seats have plenty of head- and legroom, but the third row is best reserved for children.
  • 3. . The number of 3.0-litre diesels on the market makes them the best for running costs and resale values.
  • 4. The diesels have economy figures of 27.2mpg for the 3.0, 25.5mpg for the 4.2 and 25mpg for the 6.0-litre. It's 22.2mpg for the 3.0 petrol and 20.8mpg for the 4.2 petrol.
  • 5. The Audi has a reputation for getting through a set of front tyres in under 7000 miles, and in some cases as little as 5000 miles.
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Audi Q7 4x4 full review with expert trade views

The Q7 was Audi's first attempt at a full-size 4x4 – and the resulting vehicle is pretty good. A desirable badge on the front, seven seats and solid build quality means it can tackle a muddy field and ferry the family around without breaking a sweat.

The Q7 is better-suited to on-road driving, but the air suspension system can raise and lower the ride height as required for any off-road antics. At lower speeds the ride can be unsettled, but this disappears on faster roads.

It's also surprisingly agile for such a large vehicle, with decent grip through corners and good body control. The Audi is refined and although wind- and road noise can be heard, it doesn't distract.

The cabin is spacious and the first two rows of seats have plenty of head- and legroom, but the third row is best reserved for children. Boot space is acceptable, but it can be enlarged by folding down the rearmost seats into the boot floor when they're not needed.

Trade view

3.0 TDIs are the most common used Q7s and offer the best value. Running costs are lower than other models and resale values should prove to be better, too.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Just two engine options were available at launch: a 345bhp 4.2-litre V8 petrol and a 230bhp 3.0 TDI diesel unit. Both provide good performance and smooth delivery of power.

A 276bhp 3.2-litre petrol model was introduced in 2007, along with a 326bhp 4.2 TDI diesel. In late 2008, a 6.0-litre V12 diesel producing a whopping 493bhp went on sale.

In reality, petrol Q7s are rare on the used market, so looking for a diesel will be the sensible option. The number of 3.0-litre vehicles on the market makes them the best for running costs and resale values. The Q7 is available only as an automatic.

Entry-level models come with alloy wheels, climate and cruise control, while SE trim adds electrically adjustable, heated leather seats and enhanced cabin detailing. S-line cars get sports seats and trim.

Trade view

In your face and ostentatious: the Q7 is a prestige SUV that's good to drive and well appointed as standard.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The diesels have official fuel economy figures of 27.2mpg for the 3.0-litre, 25.5mpg for the 4.2-litre and 25mpg for the 6.0-litre. That compares with 22.2mpg for the 3.0-litre petrol and 20.8mpg for the 4.2-litre petrol.

All models have high CO2 emissions, so you will pay the top road tax band no matter which model you buy. Insurance groups range from 16 to 20, so your premium won't be cheap, either.

Maintaining a Q7 isn't cheap, either, and servicing costs might make you wince - an oil and filter change is over £200. Tyres and other spare parts are equally pricey.

Trade view

3.0 TDIs are the most common used Q7s and offer the best value. Running costs are lower than other models and resale values should prove to be better, too.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Generally the Q7 is proving to be reliable, with only one or two common issues. The Audi has a reputation for getting through a set of front tyres in under 7000 miles, and in some cases as little as 5000 miles.

In most cases the outside edges wear substantially faster than any other area. The exact cause isn't clear, and Audi has been known to contribute to the cost of replacement rubber on newer cars.

Keeping a close eye on tyre pressures appears to be a key factor in minimising wear, along with ensuring the tracking is checked on a regular basis.

Other small electrical and engine faults have cropped up, but nothing consistent. A recall was issued in 2007 to cover a fault with the electrically powered tailgate, but this should have been resolved on affected models by now.

As is the case with any off-roader, you should always check the underside of the car for any damage.

Trade view

In your face and ostentatious: the Q7 is a prestige SUV that's good to drive and well appointed as standard.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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