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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For Striking looks, lots of kit and a strong, smooth V8

Against The rear seats are only big enough for children

Verdict Expensive, but comfortable, classy and refined

Go for… 630i

Avoid… M6

BMW 6 Series Convertible
  • 1. Top down, the cabin is hushed and unbuffeted, even at speed
  • 2. The hood is beautifully made and costs a fortune to replace, so check it over carefully
  • 3. Check that the iDrive system works correctly, because some are known to behave erratically
  • 4. The high rear end can make reversing tricky
  • 5. The chassis is based on the 5 Series's, so handling is polished and assured
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BMW 6 Series Convertible full review with expert trade views

It's lavishly equipped, supple-riding and quick - this impressive grand tourer was built to cover long distances. It's based on the 5 Series saloon, so it handles with all the polish you'd expect, and this convertible drives as neatly as the coupe and feels solid, although the high rear end makes reversing tricky.

Top down, the cabin is hushed and calm, even at speed. While it's a big car, there's not enough room in the back for adults, and luggage space is barely enough.

It's a relatively rare sight on UK streets, so exclusivity is assured. But, although the cabin is handsome, it doesn't have the warmth or special feel of some competitors’ interiors.

Like many other modern BMWs, many controls are handled by an iDrive system, which employs a single point-and-click dial to control heating, phone, stereo and so on. It's a love-it-or-hate-it device, so spend time with it before you buy.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Values dropping fast, 645Ci has great standard spec that sells

James Ruppert
Used car guru

Choose the 630i - the 3.0 takes you to 60mph from rest in just 6.5sec, even though it is the smallest engine in the range. Best of all, it's also the cheapest.

The engine burbles nicely when worked hard but otherwise it does its work quietly, whether you're looking at model with a six-speed manual or automatic gearbox.

Its interior isn’t quite as special as the high-performance M6’s, but it is leather-trimmed and has pretty much all you'll ever want, although sat-nav is an extra.

Like all 6 Series, the 630i comes in a choice of standard or Sport trim, the latter bringing stiffer suspension and bigger alloy wheels. We prefer standard models for their more absorbent ride and subtler looks.

If you can bear the expense of buying and running, the other options are the 650i and the M6. The latter produces 500bhp and screams to 60mph in under 5.0sec.

Trade view

John Owen

V8 models seem best at present, avoid SMG box

John Owen
Buyer,
Fords of Winsford

By BMW standards, depreciation is quite stiff on a 6 Series. By the time it's three years old, it will be worth half what it originally cost new, but that means it can be quite a bargain if you buy at the right time, after the first owner has suffered the biggest drop in value. As a result, older cars look attractive buys, although running costs mount as they enter the middle years.

Servicing costs are reasonable and, like all BMWs, intervals vary according to how you drive. Spares are dear and a pair of tyres will cost several hundred pounds to replace.

Insurance falls into group 19 for the 630i, while cover for the others is by special quote only.

For a car of this sort, fuel economy is good at up to 31mpg overall for the 630i.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Values dropping fast, 645Ci has great standard spec that sells

James Ruppert
Used car guru

To preserve the car's resale value, its history and service records must be impeccable. A high mileage isn't too much of an obstacle, provided it's all accounted for and you are able to see garage receipts to back what the service records show.

The hood is beautifully made but costs a fortune to replace, so check carefully for any mildew stains, damage from bird droppings or vandalism.

Extras such as an information system that projects into the driver's line of sight are desirable, so long as you don't pay more than a fraction of what they originally cost.

Above all, check that the iDrive system works correctly, because some are known to behave erratically. Light-coloured leather trim marks easily and shows dirt, so is best avoided if you regularly carry children or pets.

Trade view

John Owen

V8 models seem best at present, avoid SMG box

John Owen
Buyer,
Fords of Winsford
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