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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For It's got alluring looks, strong performance and fantastic grip

Against It's expensive to run, has dull steering, a poor ride, and rear visibility is bad

Verdict Its looks and V6 engine are great, but its numb steering and poor ride are not

Go for… 3.2 V6

Avoid… SRT-6

Chrysler Crossfire Roadster
  • 1. A replacement hood will cost a four-figure sum if the material is ripped, frayed or covered in mildew
  • 2. Electric seat adjusters might expire expensively after a few years
  • 3. The 3.2-litre V6 engine promises to be tough and long-lived if serviced correctly
  • 4. The firm suspension gives a ride that's far too hard for some
  • 5. The boot is awkwardly shaped and the hood folds into it, robbing most of its space
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Chrysler Crossfire Roadster full review with expert trade views

The car's striking appearance lets you believe you're driving a classic American soft-top.

But that's not the end of the plus points. The burbly 3.2 V6 may produce just 215bhp, but its mid-rev pull is better than you'd expect and it emits a rich, throaty note above 4000rpm. The SRT-6 produces rather more at 330bhp, but isn't worth the extra money.

Drivers will love the seemingly endless grip from the tyres and the excellent body control, but the ride is poor and jars over even the slightest lump and bump.

Practicality's not great, either: the cabin may be comfortable enough for two, but the boot is awkwardly shaped and the hood folds into it, robbing most of its space.

Likewise, the low driver's seat and high window line make the cabin cosy, but restrict rear visibility, so it's tricky to reverse-park.

At least, refinement is good - hood up, most road noise stays outside; hood down, the cabin is calm and civilised, even at speed - and the equipment levels are high: leather seats, dual-zone climate control and cruise control are standard. However, the quality is poor for the price.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Mercedes mechanicals at a Chrysler price. Roadster auto holds its value best

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

There really is no choice: just go for the standard V6 model - it has everything you'll need, and is much better value than the SRT6. There is a choice of manual or auto gearboxes. Neither is exceptional, but they work reasonably well.

Trade view

James Ruppert

3.2 V6 Auto and the roadster is better value, easier to sell

James Ruppert
Used car guru

That 3.2 likes petrol and it also pushes up insurance bills to group 19 for the standard 3.2 and to 20 for the SRT6.

Even with a manual gearbox, it achieves average fuel economy of just 27.2mpg, and significantly less for the SRT6. You can budget for a couple of mpg less if you're after a model with automatic transmission.

Servicing comes around every year or 12,000 miles, which is sooner than for most rivals, but main dealer charges are reasonable for a big-engined roadster.

The car itself is rare and complex, so it is best to stick with Chrysler dealers for work, or proven sports car specialists at the very least.

And the costs won't stop there. Spare parts are expensive and tyres notably so. A set of good quality replacements won't leave much change from £1000.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Mercedes mechanicals at a Chrysler price. Roadster auto holds its value best

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

The Crossfire's 3.2-litre motor promises to be tough and long-lived if serviced correctly, and the suspension and transmission look tough enough to stand the test of time.

However, Chrysler has a poor record for reliability, and there are plenty of gadgets that could play up after a few years' use: for example, the motors for the electric seat adjusters may well expire expensively after a few years.

Finally, check that hood. It's a quality item intended to last as long as the car, but a replacement will cost well into four figures if the material is ripped, frayed or covered in mildew.

Trade view

James Ruppert

3.2 V6 Auto and the roadster is better value, easier to sell

James Ruppert
Used car guru
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