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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For Roomy, well-equipped and later Grand Voyagers have clever 'Stow-n-go' seating

Against It's not as refined as its rivals, it's expensive, and most have heavy-to-lift-out seats

Verdict To transport seven people and all their luggage, there's none better than the Grand Voyager

Go for… 2.8 CRD LX

Avoid…

Chrysler Grand Voyager MPV
  • 1. This is a heavy vehicle, so pay attention to brakes and suspension on a test drive
  • 2. Pay special attention to the gearbox, especially on the diesels
  • 3. Grand can seat seven and still leave room for their luggage
  • 4. Check the cabin thoroughly for signs of abuse, especially if it has been used as an all-purpose family wagon
  • 5. The driving position is comfortable, you get a commanding view of the road and the controls are well placed
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Chrysler Grand Voyager MPV full review with expert trade views

This is a big, heavy MPV and it feels like one to drive.

Performance is reasonable once moving, but both petrol engines need to be revved hard to get the best from them - and that's hard work as well as hurting fuel consumption. The diesel is hardly frugal, either, but it has more pull, which makes it a more relaxing drive.

The Grand Voyager is hardly the sharpest car to drive, but it's tidy enough, although you can expect to hear a few complaints from the back about the bumpy ride. And, while all versions muffle road and wind noise pretty well, you'll always hear the engine, whichever one it is, and the diesel clatters, even when warm.

But, it's not all bad news. Despite its size, the Voyager is an easy car to park, the driving position is comfortable, you get a commanding view of the road and the controls are well placed. Last, but not least, compared to the standard Voyager, the Grand also leaves a good amount of space for seven passengers' luggage.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Consistent demand with 2.8 CRD LX auto and XS spec doing best

James Ruppert
Used car guru

The Grand Voyager is a far better bet than the the shorter Voyager, with space that most MPV owners can only dream of.

Given the budget, a Grand with fold-into-the-floor seats is the smartest choice. Chrysler calls them 'Stow 'n' Go' seats, and they have been fitted to all Grand Voyager models since October 2004 (you won't find them on the Voyager).

They really increase the vehicle's flexibility, because the five rearmost seats just flip out the way and back again as you need them. Without it, you'll have to remove the fiddly heavy seats yourself - and find somewhere to store them.

Choose a diesel - 2.5 CRD or, better still, 2.8 CRD - rather than the 3.3 V6 petrols, and there's no need to go beyond the entry-level trim, which is packed with kit.

Chrysler dealers and MPV specialists are the best places to find a good one.

Trade view

Duncan McLure-Fisher

Big bills and frequent failures - avoid this big people carrier

Duncan McLure-Fisher
Managing Director,
Warranty Direct

No large people-carrier is going to be cheap, but even by MPV standards, a Grand Voyager will put a hefty dent in your bank balance.

For starters, there's the asking price. You'll be able to buy plenty of other comparable second-hand MPVs for less. A Grand Voyager should, however, hold its value pretty well once you've taken the plunge.

The insurance company will want its cut of your diminishing bank balance, too. The V6 3.3 Grand Voyager, for example, takes a group 16-sized chunk of cash.

Servicing costs are steep, too. Use Chrysler main dealers and you'll pay even more for routine maintenance than on, say, a Mercedes Viano. Needless to say, a Citroen C8, Renault Grand Espace or Peugeot 807 will be cheaper.

Then there's fuel - low to mid-20s for the two petrols and 30-35mpg for the diesels. And that's with careful driving. This is a big car with big bills to match.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Consistent demand with 2.8 CRD LX auto and XS spec doing best

James Ruppert
Used car guru

Make sure you know which generation of Grand Voyager you're looking at, because you should avoid the model that was built between 1997 and 2001. It doesn't drive nearly so well and suffered a very poor safety rating. The version you're looking at here righted all of those wrongs and is substantially better.

Once you've got that sorted out, pay special attention to the gearbox, especially on the diesels. Many have been replaced under Chrysler's three-year unlimited-mileage warranty, but some will have slipped through the net.

The brakes and suspension should be examined closely, too. This is a big, heavy vehicle, even before you load it, and that takes its toll on mechanical bits and pieces.

Likewise, check the cabin thoroughly for signs of abuse, especially if it has been used as an all-purpose family wagon.

Generally, though, the Voyager and Grand Voyager are solidly built and give little trouble if looked after - so insist on a full service history.

Trade view

Duncan McLure-Fisher

Big bills and frequent failures - avoid this big people carrier

Duncan McLure-Fisher
Managing Director,
Warranty Direct
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