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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For Spacious and adaptable: you'll seat five with ease and the boot is massive. The Berlingo is cheap to buy, too

Against Not exactly streamlined, and has a few image problems. Poorly equipped.

Verdict Get past the van-like looks and you'll find a capable people carrier that will keep your motoring costs down.

Go for… 1.6 HDI 92 5dr

Avoid… 2.0 HDI 5dr

Citroën Berlingo Multispace MPV
  • 1. The Berlingo might be based on a van, but it does make a great people carrier as a result.
  • 2. All models come with power steering, electric front windows and electric door mirrors, but expect the bare minimum on the base Forte.
  • 3. Here's where the Berlingo earns its stripes, as it's frugal and cheap to maintain. Both the 1.6-litre diesels give an official average of 47.9mpg; much better than the petrol models, which manage arou
  • 4. The electrics can be a cause for concern; in some cases the engine can suddenly die, with garages left struggling to find the fault.
  • 5. Owners have also complained of cabin trim falling off or breaking.
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Citroën Berlingo Multispace MPV full review with expert trade views

If you want maximum practicality and versatility for your money, the Berlingo takes some beating.

The Berlingo might be based on a van, but it makes a great people carrier as a result. It's surprisingly good to drive, though, and it rides bumps fairly well, too. The Citroen's height does mean that it leans round bends a little, but it still has an enjoyable ride. The steering is light and there's good all-round visibility. It's also reasonably refined, although the diesels start to clatter and wind noise becomes noticeable as speed increases.

However, you don't buy this kind of car because of the way it drives. The Berlingo seats five adults with ease, along with a large boot. Headroom is good, and there are plenty of cubbyholes and pockets to stash bits and bobs. Options include overhead storage compartments, or a full-length electric sunroof.

Trade view

Go for the 1.6 HDI and you can't go wrong. Good economy, low emissions and not too noisy - all you need in a Berlingo.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Of the four engines available, the two petrols are acceptable, but need to be pushed fairly hard. The 75bhp 1.4-litre is not as slow as you might think, but the 110bhp 1.6 is much more fun.

The diesel engine options have changed over the car's lifetime. Originally there was a 71bhp 1.9-litre and a 90bhp 2.0, which were available until 2005. These were replaced with two 1.6-litre engines: a 75bhp and a 92bhp unit. These are a much better bet because they give better fuel economy and lower carbon dioxide emissions. The 75bhp isn't turbocharged, making it a little sluggish, while the 92bhp engine is refined and smooth.

All models come with power steering, electric front windows and electric door mirrors, but expect the bare minimum on the base Forte. The Desire adds a CD player and a few trinkets. The standard specification was improved from 2005, but things such as air-con and alloys were never included in the price, so look for cars with them included.

Models before 2006 came with only one airbag as standard, but from this date on curtain airbags were added as standard. ISOFIX child seat fixings were standard throughout, though.

Trade view

Not the last word in elegance, but capable and reliable. Pastel colour paint schemes are a personal choice, and bright red models look like Postman Pat's van.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Here's where the Berlingo earns its stripes, as it's frugal and cheap to maintain. Both the 1.6-litre diesels give an official average of 47.9mpg; much better than the petrol models, which manage around 37mpg. The diesels also emit much less C02, making them cheaper to tax.

Insurance shouldn't be a worry, with the highest rating for the most powerful diesel being group 6. Servicing costs are roughly the same as its rivals'.

Resale values are fairly static, with the diesels worth not that much more than the petrols. Your choice of colour might make a difference, though, because some of the pastel paint colours widely available don't appeal to many buyers. Silver, metallic grey and more subdued colours are a better bet - unless the car is priced accordingly.

Trade view

Go for the 1.6 HDI and you can't go wrong. Good economy, low emissions and not too noisy - all you need in a Berlingo.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Some drivers find the driving position uncomfortable, with the seats overly soft and failing to give sufficient leg support. The position of the steering wheel might also feel awkward – so make sure you take a thorough test drive before buying.

The car's electrics cause roughly a third of faults, with everything from the dashboard to foglights failing. In some cases, the engine can also stop, and garages struggle to find the cause.

The roof-mounted aerial can allow water to leak into the cabin, while the passenger door seal has been known to let water into the footwell. Check for damp patches and a musty smell.

Plastic wheelarch linings can work loose after driving through deep puddles. Eventually it starts to rub against the tyre and will then to be removed and replaced. Owners have also complained of cabin trim falling off or breaking.

Trade view

Not the last word in elegance, but capable and reliable. Pastel colour paint schemes are a personal choice, and bright red models look like Postman Pat's van.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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