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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For The Citroen C5 Tourer is capable, has lots of luggage and there's space inside for five. It's also reasonable to drive.

Against Some rivals offer more practicality, while long-term reliability is uncertain.

Verdict The C5 Tourer is a surprising blend of sophistication and refinement at a reasonable price

Go for… 2.0 HDi VTR+

Avoid… 2.7 HDi Exclusive

Citroën C5 Estate
  • 1. There's ample leg- and head-room for five, and the cabin is a pleasant environment; only the fussy dashboard may distract you
  • 2. The conventional suspension set-up is slightly better than the optional gas-filled system
  • 3. Always check that the tyres have worn evenly, which indicates that the wheels are correctly aligned
  • 4. The C5 does have a big boot, but rivals such as the Ford Mondeo and Mazda 6 offer greater carrying capacity
  • 5. Listen carefully during the test drive for any mysterious clonks and bangs from under the car
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Citroën C5 Estate full review with expert trade views

You may not expect the C5 Tourer to deliver style and substance, but it'll handle the school run, trips to the tip and shopping sprees, while still looking sophisticated. For an estate the C5 is supremely refined and quiet, even at motorway speeds. Passengers are protected from wind and road noise, only a little engine noise creeping in. There's ample leg- and head-room for five, and the cabin is a pleasant environment; only the fussy dashboard may distract you.

The C5 does have a big boot, but rivals such as the Ford Mondeo and Mazda 6 offer greater carrying capacity, partly because the sloping rear tailgate eats into the load space. As you'd expect, the rear seats fold flat for larger loads.

The Citroen handles decently, and has a supple ride that irons out most lumps. It's unsettled by larger bumps, however, and there's noticeable body roll through faster bends. The conventional suspension set-up has the slight edge on the optional gas-filled system.

Trade view

Penny-pinchers should consider the 1.6 HDI which sips 49.6mpg, but the 2.0 HDI with 46.3mpg is much the better all-round load lugger.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Finding a petrol-powered C5 Touring on the used market is nigh on impossible, so you'll probably find yourself looking for a diesel.

The 1.6-litre diesel with 108bhp may provide an official average of 50.4mpg, but it can feel underpowered. The 2.0-litre with 136bhp will suit most people, as it provides the best marriage of performance and economy. For more power check out the 2.2-litre with 171bhp, the rare 2.7-litre with 205bhp, or even the almost mythical 3.0-litre V6 with 237bhp.

The entry-level SX comes well equipped with climate and cruise controls as well as electric windows all round. Stump up for the VTR+ and you'll get alloys, automatic lights and wipers, and duel-zone climate control.

In mid-2009 the VTR+ Nav edition included sat-nav as standard. The top-of-the-range Exclusives have electrically adjustable seats, parking sensors and air suspension as standard.

Trade view

Look beyond the reputation of the previous C5: this is a great estate that looks sharp and should prove enjoyable to own.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The 1.6-litre baby of the family manages an official of 49.6mpg, beating the 2.0-litre's 46.3mpg. The 2.2-litre is still respectable at 42.8mpg, but the rarely seen 2.7- and 3.0-litres manage 33.2mpg only and 38.2mpg respectively.

With CO2 emissions roughly the same as its rivals, the C5 won't cost much more to tax than the likes of the Mazda 6 - unless you opt for the powerful diesels, which peak at 225g/km for the 2.7-litre. Insurance premiums shouldn't cause any nightmares, with cars classed between groups 8 and 14.

This C5 marks a genuine step forward in build quality and design compared with the previous model, so should hold its value better. Expect it to keep up with the likes of the Ford Mondeo Estate, but not the Honda Accord Tourer.

Trade view

Penny-pinchers should consider the 1.6 HDI which sips 49.6mpg, but the 2.0 HDI with 46.3mpg is much the better all-round load lugger.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Citroen doesn't have the best reputation for reliability but, so far, C5 owners have made few complaints. Almost every used Citroen C5 Tourer started life as a company or fleet car, so its condition will obviously vary according to how careful the user was. Buy only the tidiest examples, with a full service history.

Don't shy away from high-mileage examples. They may well have spent most of their time on motorways, and if they've been serviced on time could make a reasonable buy. Always check that the tyres have worn evenly (which indicates that the wheels are correctly aligned). Kerbing and potholes can throw them out of whack.

The biggest problems on the previous generation C5 were caused by the electrics, followed by the suspension. Check that all switch and controls work correctly and listen carefully during the test drive for any mysterious clonks and bangs from under the car.

Trade view

Look beyond the reputation of the previous C5: this is a great estate that looks sharp and should prove enjoyable to own.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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