We use cookies on whatcar.com to improve your browsing experience and to provide you with relevant content and advertising, by continuing to use our site you agree to this. Please see our privacy policy for more details. Continue

What Car? says

1 out of 5 stars

For Cheap to buy; reliable Mercedes engines

Against Odd styling and a poor drive

Verdict Other than price, there’s little in its favour

Go for… 2.9 TD

Avoid…

Daewoo Korando 4x4
  • 1. Most owners seem happy with the Korando. It works reasonably well off-road and is a good towcar
  • 2. If you're looking at a car built in 1999 or 2000 with an auto 'box, check the recall work has been carried out
  • 3. The gearshift, steering and suspension are all known to have been weak points
  • 4. It's far from attractive inside. The driving position is upright and truck-like, and the dash poor
  • 5. The engines should be no problem. They have proved rugged and reliable
advertisement

Daewoo Korando 4x4 full review with expert trade views

Like its bigger brother, the Musso, the Korando began life as a Ssangyong and only took on its new identity once Daewoo had taken over its rival.

The cabin is reasonably spacious for four people. However, make no mistake: despite the car’s relatively large size, this is no five-seater, because the rear seat is too cramped to fit three across.

It’s also not a particularly enjoyable car to drive. The driving position is upright and truck-like, and the dash poor, while performance is sluggish and the ride too firm. Whereas the Toyota RAV4 and Honda CR-V feel nimble on the road, the Korando feels like a much bigger car, with poor refinement and loads of body roll.

If there is a saving grace, it’s that the Korando works reasonably well off-road, thanks to its high- and low-ratio gears, and is a good tow car.

Trade view

John Owen

Great for off-roading in the dark - no one will see you

John Owen
Buyer,
Fords of Winsford

Like the Musso, the Korando offers a simple choice between two engines, both of which were built under licence from Mercedes. The cheaper option is a 2.3-litre petrol unit, but we’d recommend spending a few hundred more to buy the 2.9-litre turbodiesel. Although it’s not significantly more economical, its extra pull makes it much easier to drive in everyday traffic, and is better suited to off-road work.

Each engine came with only one trim level, but that was fairly well specified for the time, with standard air-con, electric windows, traction control and anti-lock brakes. However, it only ever had a driver’s airbag.

When the car was new, options were few and far between. However, if you’re buying the petrol version, it’s worth looking out for a model with the automatic gearbox (unavailable on the diesel-engined model). Alloy wheels, also an option when the car was new, are also worth tracking down.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Not many around and on the 2.9 TD makes sense as a retail option

James Ruppert
Used car guru

There’s no doubt that the Korando’s biggest attraction is its price. Compared with the likes of the RAV4 and CR-V, the Korando is significantly cheaper.

However, you’ll immediately lose some of what you’ve saved here because the Korando – in group 12 – will cost a little more to insure than its rivals. Its fuel economy is also pretty poor, with even the diesel returning less than 29mpg, which is worse than petrol versions of the RAV4, CR-V. Of the Korando’s obvious rivals, only the Jeep Wrangler has worse fuel economy.

Sadly, every Korando is too old now to qualify for the free servicing that was one of its biggest attractions as a new car. However, there should be no financial shocks when a Korando needs work.

Trade view

John Owen

Great for off-roading in the dark - no one will see you

John Owen
Buyer,
Fords of Winsford

Only one recall – in 2001 – has affected the Korando. On models built in 1999 or 2000 with an automatic gearbox, there was a chance that the Park facility might not engage properly.

The good news is that both the Korando’s engines are also used in the larger Musso, and they have proved very rugged and reliable. However, Warranty Direct tells us that there are some other problems to watch out for. In particular, the gearshift, steering and suspension are all known to be weak points.

The Korando was never a big seller, so finding out what owners think is difficult. However, the few reports online are mostly positive, with only occasional faults reported with the electrics.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Not many around and on the 2.9 TD makes sense as a retail option

James Ruppert
Used car guru
Haymarket Logo What Car? is brought to you by Haymarket Consumer Media
What Car? is part of Haymarket Motoring
© Haymarket Media Group 2014