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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For The Mondeo is spacious and great to drive

Against It loses money fast early in life and refinement is average

Verdict It's a highly competent load carrier capable of entertaining keen drivers

Go for… 2.0-litre petrol/diesel LX

Avoid… V6 petrols and 1.8s

Ford Mondeo Estate
  • 1. The boot is great: long, wide and free from intrusions
  • 2. The engines are largely trouble-free if they are maintained properly
  • 3. Electrical gremlins are the biggest source of trouble, so make sure everything works properly
  • 4. Problems with the fuel system are not unknown
  • 5. Avoid cars with 17-inch wheels and low-profile tyres, as they ride too firmly
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Ford Mondeo Estate full review with expert trade views

This Mondeo won’t disappoint, whether you’re into loading up the boot or loading up the suspension. The cargo space is long, wide and free from intrusions, and it’s easy to lower the rear seats to extend the 540-litre boot capacity to 1700. The loading lip is a little high, but there are strips set into the floor to help you get stuff inside, and hooks to strap it down.

Thanks to the alert steering and well-controlled body movements, the handling is fluid, and the ride quality is supple, provided you avoid cars with the optional 17-inch wheels and low-profile tyres. Motorway journeys are quiet and painless, although the 1.8s can be noisy.

Inside, Ford has taken a VW Passat approach to fixtures, fittings and the layout of controls. A good driving position, excellent rear room (more headroom than the hatch or saloon versions), solid build quality and ample safety equipment complete its appeal.

Trade view

Kurtis Williams

Well put together and good value for money. Large loading space

Kurtis Williams
Buyer,
Lex Vehicle Leasing

There are more than 80 models out there, so making the right choice is tough. However, you can forget the 1.8-litre petrols straight away. The Mondeo estate is heavier than the hatch, and the 1.8 can struggle. It’s also too noisy at motorway speeds.

The 2.5- and 3.0-litre V6s are enjoyable, until you fill up - which will be pretty regularly at the 27mpg you can expect. Instead, our favourite petrol is the 2.0-litre for its welcome blend of power and economy.

Our favourite overall, however, is the 128bhp 2.0 turbodiesel, which is perfect for day-to-day driving, with strong consistent response from low revs. We’d take it over the 2.0 petrol, or any of the other diesels, for that matter.

Of all the various trims, LX is the best to buy, with six airbags, air-con and electric front windows. But, if you do want a little more, Zetec adds alloy wheels and electric rear windows, Ghia throws in a CD changer and Ghia X extends the luxuries to climate control, leather seats and an electric sunroof.

Trade view

Duncan McLure-Fisher

Good reliability and average repair bills - watch for electrical faults

Duncan McLure-Fisher
Managing Director,
Warranty Direct

The biggest worry is depreciation. If you buy nearly new, make sure the car is cheap enough to offset the heavy loss in value it will suffer. By its third and fourth years, however, the effects of depreciation tail off to far more modest levels. So that’s where the smart money goes.

The V6s are hard to track down, and not worth the effort - they hit your wallet hard each time you fill up (27mpg) and renew your insurance (2.5s are group 15, 3.0s are 16). The 2.2 TDCi turbodiesels get walloped for group 16, too, but return a more palatable 45mpg. The 2.0 TDCi cars are the most economical (45.6-48.7mpg and group 9-10), but the 1.8 (group 8) and 2.0 (groups 9-11) petrols should give about 35mpg.

Typical service costs are on a par with those of the Vauxhall Vectra Estate, and an independent outlet should save you about 35% on labour compared to franchised dealer rates.

Trade view

Kurtis Williams

Well put together and good value for money. Large loading space

Kurtis Williams
Buyer,
Lex Vehicle Leasing

In What Car?'s Reliability Index, Ford's performance has traditionally been rather disappointing, but the Mondeo is one of the company's better models, and when things do go wrong, the time and costs involved are not too bad.

According to the findings of the JD Power surveys, owners are basically satisfied with the car's quality and reliability, making this the second-highest rated Ford after the Focus.

Although faults are rare, Warranty Direct says that the most common are electrical, responsible for just over a quarter of all claims, but complaints about the suspension are not far behind.

The engines and transmissions are basically sound, although we have heard of some difficulties with the four-speed automatic transmissions on 2.0-litre petrol models, which can fail after 60,000 miles.

Some problems with injectors on the TDCi engines have been reported, but the majority of owners' comments have been almost uniformly positive.

Trade view

Duncan McLure-Fisher

Good reliability and average repair bills - watch for electrical faults

Duncan McLure-Fisher
Managing Director,
Warranty Direct
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