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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For Refined, safe and good to drive

Against Size, image, estate's rarity

Verdict Perfect family car and great value

Go for… 2.0TDCI Zetec

Avoid… 2.5 T Titanium

Ford Mondeo Estate
  • 1. The 2.0-litre is the one most suited to the Mondeo, with plenty of performance that's delivered in smooth and quiet manner.
  • 2. Unfortunately, the estate version isn't very common on the used market, so you may have to hunt for the right car.
  • 3. Fuel consumption is between 53.3mpg and 45.6mpg for the diesels and 39.2mpg to 30.4 for the petrols.
  • 4. The keyless entry and ignition system on certain models can stop working, stranding owners or locking them out of their cars. The problem is an intermittent fault, however, and doesn't always show its
  • 5. Some people struggle with the size of the Mondeo, and the visibility from the driver's seat doesn't help, because it's hard to judge where the corners are.
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Ford Mondeo Estate full review with expert trade views

It's hard to find fault with this Ford Mondeo, because it does everything so well. It's a comfortable cruiser for covering motorway miles, yet it's still great fun to drive. The Mondeo is spacious inside, with loads of head- and legroom for everyone, and it's solid and well put together. Even the entry-level models are well equipped; with air-conditioning, cruise control, electric front windows and a quick-clear windscreen as standard.

The boot is large, well-shaped and easy to get at through the large tailgate, and with the split-folding rear seats down there's a massive 1685-litre area to load up. Unfortunately, the estate version isn't very common on the used market, so you may have to hunt for the right car.

Some people struggle with the size of the Mondeo, and the visibility from the driver's seat doesn't help, because it's hard to judge where the corners are. Running costs should be reasonable, given that the Ford isn't expensive to maintain or run, and depreciation is acceptable if you choose the right models. The car's biggest problem, however, is the stigma that some attach to the Mondeo name.

Trade view

Keep your eyes peeled for bargain Mondeos at car supermarkets, and then still have a haggle over the price.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The two 1.6-litre petrol engines, with 110bhp and 125bhp, aren't powerful enough for a car this size, while the 2.0-litre petrol is only just acceptable. The 2.3-litre petrol model is rare and comes with an automatic gearbox only, while the turbocharged 2.5 is fast but thirsty.

The diesel models are far more popular, and will have better residual value in the long term. You might be tempted by the 1.8-litre but it's not the best engine due to its poor power delivery. The 2.0-litre is the one most suited to the Mondeo, with plenty of performance that's delivered in smooth and quiet manner. The 2.2-litre diesel doesn't offer much extra in the way of performance, so it's not worth paying much of a premium for.

The entry-level Edge has the essentials, but stretch to a Zetec and you'll add alloy wheels, climate control and rear electric windows. Ghias have automatic lights and wipers, enhanced cabin trim and lighting, along with a CD autochanger. The Titanium trims up the ante with upgraded alloys, cabin details and bodykits. For value, the Zetecs are hard to beat.

Trade view

A great used car, but avoid overpriced examples on some franchised dealers forecourts.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Servicing the Mondeo isn't too expensive, or much different to rivals. Shop around, because dealers' prices can vary, and you can also consider competent independents.

Insurance groups range from 7 to 9 for the smaller petrols, with the 2.3 and the 2.5-litres between groups 10 and 14. The diesels go from group 7 up to 12.

Depreciation will be one of the biggest costs, and choosing the right model will make a massive difference. The larger petrol models, are bad news, so buy only if the price is low enough to offset some of what you'll lose when you sell. The diesel models have the strongest values, but Titanium models aren't worth that much more, no matter how many optional extras are fitted. Fuel consumption is between 53.3mpg and 45.6mpg for the diesels and 39.2mpg to 30.4 for the petrols.

Trade view

Keep your eyes peeled for bargain Mondeos at car supermarkets, and then still have a haggle over the price.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Most Mondeos are solid and reliable with no obvious problems having cropped up. However, there have been some engine issues reported, with a few 2.0-litre diesels cutting out unexpectedly while driving. Dealers can solve this with a software update to the car's ECU.

The keyless entry and ignition system on certain models can stop working, stranding owners or locking them out of their cars. The problem is an intermittent fault, however, and doesn't always show itself.

Many owners complain of loose or rattling cabin trim, especially around the dashboard and driver's door, while there have also been reports of seat problems, with the side bolsters of some collapsing after only a short time.

Trade view

A great used car, but avoid overpriced examples on some franchised dealers forecourts.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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