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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For Good-looking, spacious and dependable

Against Expensive compared with rivals

Verdict A well-equipped and stylish family saloon

Go for… 2.2 i-DTEC EX

Avoid… 2.4 i-VTEC EX

Honda Accord Saloon
  • 1. It’s designed with the business user in mind. It’s refined on the motorway, with virtually no wind- and road noise penetrating the cabin
  • 2. The fabulously smooth and flexible 2.2 i-DTEC is the pick of the range.
  • 3. The diesel models average 50.4mpg or 48.7mpg, depending on their power, while the 2.0-litre petrol does around 38mpg, and the 2.2-litre about 32mpg
  • 4. When it comes to emissions, the lower-powered diesel emits 148g/km, while the Type S produces 154g/km. The petrols produce between 168g/km and 209g/km
  • 5. Stereo issues and temperamental Bluetooth phone systems have all been mentioned, but the biggest reported concern is cabin trim and build quality
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Honda Accord Saloon full review with expert trade views

Despite looking like the previous Accord, this model is classed as an all-new car. In reality, it’s an evolution of the older design, improving on the car’s already capable performance.

It’s designed with the business user in mind. It’s refined on the motorway, with virtually no wind- and road noise penetrating the cabin.

There’s plenty of leg- and headroom for three in the back, while those in the front won't go short on space, either. The downside is the modest-sized boot.

Honda has a good reputation for reliability and the Accord lives up to it.

Trade view

The diesel automatic model came out in 2009, so don’t bother looking for an earlier example.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The majority of Accords are diesel-powered, mainly because they were bought as fleet and lease cars. The fabulously smooth and flexible 2.2 i-DTEC is the pick of the range. It comes in either 148bhp or 177bhp variants, with the first suitable for most.

If you're intent on a petrol Accord, then the 154bhp 2.0-litre is refined and fairly frugal, while the 198bhp 2.4-litre has lots of pace, but high fuel costs.

From launch, the only automatic gearbox option was available on the petrol models, but a five-speed auto 'box was introduced on the less-powerful diesel model in 2009.

The entry-level ES model comes with climate control, alloy wheels, electric windows and cruise control. The EX trim gets leather upholstery, sat-nav and Bluetooth. GT adds a sporty bodykit to both the ES and EX models, while Nav models add sat-nav. There’s also the sporty Type S – fitted with the more powerful diesel engine – which gets goodies such as leather-trimmed and heated electric seats.

Trade view

A diesel Accord is by far the smartest buy, but the-top-of-the-range EX model doesn’t hold its value well.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The diesel models average 50.4mpg or 48.7mpg, depending on their power, while the 2.0-litre petrol does around 38mpg, and the 2.2-litre about 32mpg.

When it comes to emissions, the lower-powered diesel emits 148g/km, while the Type S produces 154g/km. The petrols produce between 168g/km and 209g/km.

Insurance premiums aren’t unreasonable, with the majority of models classed between groups 22 and 27.

One benefit of Honda ownership is the slow deprecation rate, especially in the desirable diesel models.

Servicing costs are generally slightly cheaper than those of rivals such as the Ford Mondeo and the Volkswagen Passat, but the Honda will cost more to buy in the first place.

Trade view

The diesel automatic model came out in 2009, so don’t bother looking for an earlier example.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Honda always does well in customer satisfaction and reliability surveys, and the Accord upholds this tradition. It topped the family car category of the 2010 JD Power survey, and came fifth overall.

However, there is the odd grumble from owners, with the cabin the most problematic. Stereo issues and temperamental Bluetooth phone systems have all been mentioned, but the biggest reported concern is cabin trim and build quality. Squeaks, rattles and poor resistance to everyday wear and tear are common complaints.

Trade view

A diesel Accord is by far the smartest buy, but the-top-of-the-range EX model doesn’t hold its value well.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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