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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For An awful lot of car for not much cash; the i10 is good to drive, cheap to run, well equipped and impressively spacious for a city car.

Against Not a lot of security kit across the range.

Verdict The Hyundai i10 is one of the best city cars out there, and it’s also one of the cheapest on the used market to buy and run. It doesn’t get much better for buyers on a budget.

Go for… 1.2 Comfort

Avoid… 1.1

Hyundai i10 Hatchback
  • 1. An awful lot of car for not much cash; the i10 is good to drive, cheap to run, well equipped and impressively spacious for a city car
  • 2. Not a lot of security kit across the range
  • 3. A car this tiny is never going to be the last word in practicality, but for a city car, the i10 is superb
  • 4. The Blue 1.0 is flexible enough in town, and surprisingly sprightly on the open road if you’re prepared to rev it
  • 5. The most common complaints are to do with the seatbelt mounts, which can become squeaky over time
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Hyundai i10 Hatchback full review with expert trade views

A car this tiny is never going to be the last word in practicality, but for a city car, the i10 is superb. There’s enough head- and legroom for four adults to sit comfortably. The boot is big enough for a few small bags, with split-fold rear seats allowing a useful extension of the load area.

It’s easy to get comfortable at the wheel of most versions, and the simple dashboard design makes it easy to find all the functions. Every switch is clearly marked. Visibility is pretty good too, but be warned: entry-level cars miss out on seat-height adjustment.

All i10s come with anti-lock brakes. If you do find yourself in an unavoidable situation, twin front- and side airbags are there to protect you. Certain items are missing from the equipment roster, though, such as curtain airbags and deadlocks.

Trade view

It manages to be everything you want from a car for a superb used price

Rory White
Used car writer

An i10 face-lift in September 2010, focused mainly on visual exterior changes. Models prior to this date should be noticeably cheaper.

Three petrol engines are available. Early i10s came with 1.1-litre engines, but we’d avoid these because they’re a little short on flexibility, refinement and economy. The eco-focused Blue model, introduced in 2011, has a 1.0-litre three-cylinder engine producing 68bhp. The four-cylinder 1.2 option has 85bhp.

The Blue 1.0 is flexible enough in town, and surprisingly sprightly on the open road if you’re prepared to rev it. The more-powerful 1.2 makes life a little more relaxed in both environments. It’s the best choice for used buyers.

Blue and Classic models share a similar specification. Both come with essentials such as air-conditioning, electric front windows, and a CD player with USB port. Our favourite Comfort trim adds remote locking, alloy wheels, powered rear windows, and front foglamps, while range-topping Style cars come with an electric sunroof, heated front seats and a bit more chrome and leather.

Trade view

The i10 is the ultimate in no-frills motoring

Rory White
Used car writer

Whichever model you choose, the i10 has brilliant fuel economy, low road tax and minimal running costs. Average economy is 56.5mpg in early 1.1 models and climbs to 67.3mpg for the 2011 Blue model – although as a used buy, this is still quite expensive.

CO2 is consistently low, so road tax never gets expensive, either. New Hyundais get a five-year warranty as standard, and many used examples still fall under this, so ask before you buy because it’ll save you cash later on.

Trade view

It manages to be everything you want from a car for a superb used price

Rory White
Used car writer

The most common complaints are to do with the seatbelt mounts, which can become squeaky over time. Others have reported first gear being too stiff and the fuel gauge getting stuck. It’s also worth checking the dash button, particularly the foglight switches, which can come away.

Trade view

The i10 is the ultimate in no-frills motoring

Rory White
Used car writer
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