We use cookies on whatcar.com to improve your browsing experience and to provide you with relevant content and advertising, by continuing to use our site you agree to this. Please see our privacy policy for more details. Continue

What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For The car has excellent safety equipment and practical sliding doors

Against It suffers from firm suspension and too much road noise

Verdict It's an attractive, flexible, spacious and fun-to-drive seven-seat MPV

Go for… 2.0 D TS

Avoid… 1.8 petrol

Mazda 5 MPV
  • 1. The sliding rear doors are a god-send in tight parking spaces
  • 2. Diesel engines are better than petrols, but models built between October and December 2005 had a potential stalling problem remedied by a recall
  • 3. Very high-mileage cars may have tired suspension components so have this checked out
  • 4. A full service history with evidence of regular oil changes is particularly important for the diesel models
  • 5. The two rear seats fold flat into the floor to create more luggage space
advertisement

Mazda 5 MPV full review with expert trade views

The 5 seats seven. The middle row of seats consists of two large outer seats that move back- and forwards independently, plus a smaller middle seat. The base of this middle seat folds away and the back forms an armrest, or moves out of the way to allow passengers into the two rear seats, which fold flat into the floor to create more luggage space.

That's all very clever, but the real star of the show are the sliding rear doors, which are a real help in tight parking spaces.

Some of the cabin’s plastics feel a little flimsy, but for the most part the dash looks upmarket and clearly laid out. The driving position is good, too, and there’s a loads of oddment stowage in the well thought-out cabin.

On the road the 5 has a slightly sporting feel. It certainly handles well enough, but the price is a firm ride and a slight lack of refinement.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Limited numbers. 1.8 petrol will suit most. Big premium for diesel

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

The 113bhp 1.8-litre petrol engine doesn’t do a bad a job, but if you're regularly going to use the car loaded to the gunwales, you’ll soon tire of its mediocre performance. With 143bhp and 136lb ft of pulling power, the 2.0-litre petrol does a much better job.

It's still not the best engine, though. For real mid-range response and an engine that doesn’t have to be worked hard to provide it, you have to go for the 2.0-litre diesel. Its 108bhp may not sound that much, but it’s got 229lb ft of pulling power and that's crucial in making it our recommendation. It's so good, in fact, that there's no point bothering with the more powerful 141bhp/266lb ft version.

There are three trim levels: TS, TS2 and Sport. Even if you pick up a basic second-hand TS at a Mazda dealer it’ll still have plenty of kit with six airbags, remote locking, electric front windows, air-con and a CD-player.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Limited supply for a sought-after vehicle, 2.0D TS best spec

James Ruppert
Used car guru

You’ll hardly have to remortgage your house to arrange for insurance cover for your Mazda 5. Even if you treat yourself to a top-spec Sport, you'll still be paying no more than a group 8 premium. Stick with the less flash TS and TS2 versions and insurance costs will be no more than group 6.

There’s little to split the two petrol engines when it comes to fuel economy and running costs. The 1.8-litre has a claimed 35.7mpg and the 2.0-litre returns 34.4mpg. Opt for a diesel and you’ll see a 10mpg improvement on that figure, with 44.8mpg for the lesser unit and 44.9mpg for the more powerful 141bhp engine.

Both diesels will be slightly pricier to buy and to service than the petrol-powered versions. However, Mazda repair bills sit at the lower end of the class average.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Limited numbers. 1.8 petrol will suit most. Big premium for diesel

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

There's no doubt that the diesel engines are a better bet than their petrol counterparts. However, if the car you're looking at was built between October and December 2005, it should have been recalled to have a potential stalling problem remedied. Have a look on the Vehicle and Operator Agency website at www.vosa.gov.uk for the full details.

On the whole, Mazda has always put in solid performances in studies such as the JD Power Customer Satisfaction Survey, so you can expect strong mechanical components and a hard-wearing interior.

Very high-mileage cars may have tired suspension components so have this checked. A full service history with evidence of regular oil changes is particularly important for the diesel engines.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Limited supply for a sought-after vehicle, 2.0D TS best spec

James Ruppert
Used car guru
Haymarket Logo What Car? is brought to you by Haymarket Consumer Media
What Car? is part of Haymarket Motoring
© Haymarket Media Group 2014