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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For The 6 Estate is great to drive, reliable and distinctive

Against Cabin plastics; could be more refined

Verdict Verdict One of the great estates

Go for… 2.2D 136 TS3

Avoid… 1.8 S

Mazda 6 Estate
  • 1. This version of the 6 is larger than the car it replaced but it's actually lighter. The light-weight loss gives it a sporty edge that makes it nimble and grippy in the bends.
  • 2. The large tailgate gives great access to the big boot, and for even bigger loads you can drop the split folding rear seats to create a large load space.
  • 3. All models come with stability control and six airbags.
  • 4. Servicing costs are typical for this class of car, but Mazda's reliability record means bills should be kept to a minimum.
  • 5. The older 2.0-litre diesel engine can suffer with lubrication problems, where fuel finds its way into the oil system.
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Mazda 6 Estate full review with expert trade views

The original Mazda 6 ('02-'07) set a high standard on the used car market for value, but this newer model might just beat it. It's good to drive and ride in, spacious and should prove reliable.

This version of the 6 is larger than the car it replaced but it's actually lighter. The light-weight loss gives it a sporty edge that makes it nimble and grippy in the bends. The ride is on the firm side, but it shouldn't cause any discomfort. The Mazda isn't quite as refined as class leaders, but it's still relaxed.

The large tailgate gives great access to the big boot, and for even bigger loads you can drop the split folding rear seats to create a large load space.

Mazda's interior design has a sporty feel, but some of the materials feel a little low rent. There's good legroom for five passengers, along with reasonable headroom for taller passengers in the back.

Trade view

Go for the 2.2-litre diesel over the 2.0-litre – it's much nicer to live with.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Petrol power comes in the form of a 118bhp 1.8-litre, or a more capable 145bhp 2.0-litre that's almost as fuel efficient. There is a 2.5-litre petrol engine, but it's rare and not really worth the time you'll take to find it.

This version of the 6 was originally available with a 138bhp 2.0-litre diesel engine, which was punchy, but a bit raucous. You're better off looking for the 2.2-litre unit introduced in early '09, with either123bhp, 161bhp or 182bhp. We'd opt for the 161bhp version because it delivers the best blend of performance and efficiency.

The entry-level S trim comes with air-con, alloys and electric windows all round. The TS adds cruise control and dual-zone climate control. The TS2 has automatic headlights, Bluetooth and a CD multichanger, while the Sport gets bigger wheels and a distinctive bodykit. Sport Luxury brings full leather seats and parking sensors.

All models come with stability control and six airbags.

Trade view

Sure-footed, stylish, practical and reliable – there's little to dislike about the Mazda 6.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The Mazda 6's low CO2 emissions result in reasonable road tax rates for a family car. The 2.2-litre diesel is the lowest polluter, with emissions of 147g/km, but the 1.8-litre and 2.0-litre petrol models aren't far behind at 162g/km and 168g/km.

These low emissions also mean that fuel economy is respectable: the diesels do an average of between 50.4mpg and 51.4mpg, while the petrols come in at around 40mpg.

Servicing costs are typical for this class of car, but Mazda's reliability record means bills should be kept to a minimum.

Insurance starts at group 20 for the smallest petrol, rising to 27 for the most powerful diesel.

Trade view

Go for the 2.2-litre diesel over the 2.0-litre – it's much nicer to live with.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The older 2.0-litre diesel engine can suffer with lubrication problems, where fuel finds its way into the oil system. Keep an eye on the car's oil level and, if it starts to creep up, arrange for an oil change and examination.

The gearbox on diesel models can become stiff and reluctant to change, but dealers should be able to resolve this. Other issues include the air-con system leaking coolant, plus creaks and squeaks from the dashboard and centre consol.

Trade view

Sure-footed, stylish, practical and reliable – there's little to dislike about the Mazda 6.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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