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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For The Grandis looks great, but it's also spacious, flexible and well equipped

Against The petrol engine is thirsty, the diesel motor is noisy and the steering is vague

Verdict It's a practical, stylish and well equipped MPV, but the diesel isn't refined enough

Go for… 2.4-litre petrol Classic

Avoid… Diesels and Elegance trim

Mitsubishi Grandis MPV
  • 1. Unlike many rivals, the Grandis gives you decent luggage space even when all seven seats are in place
  • 2. There's enough legroom throughout, but six-footers will find headroom tight in the third row
  • 3. You can save big money by shopping around for servicing - independent Mitsubishi specialists are among the cheapest
  • 4. Residual values are no better than reasonable for the class, so a used Grandis shouldn't be more expensive than its main rivals
  • 5. The smart dashboard is logically laid out
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Mitsubishi Grandis MPV full review with expert trade views

The Grandis is a seven-seater sized somewhere between compact MPVs like Vauxhall's Zafira and traditional MPVs like the Renault Espace. It features a sliding three-person bench in the middle row, while the two seats behind can be folded into the floor or flipped back to make picnic chairs.

Unlike many rivals, the Grandis gives you a decent amount of luggage space when all seven seats are occupied. There's enough legroom, too, but six-footers will find headroom tight in the third row.

Further forward, the driver sits high up and forward visibility is good. It's easy to make yourself comfortable, even though the steering wheel only moves up and down, and the smart dashboard is logically laid out.

Still, the Grandis is no driver's car. The steering is light and easy in town but feels over-assisted at higher speeds, and there's body lean around corners. The ride is generally smooth, although noise and vibrations from big bumps can intrude.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Rare on the used market but 2.0 DiD best model. 2.4 Auto very thirsty

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

Two engines are available - a 162bhp 2.4-litre petrol and a 134bhp 2.0-litre diesel. Both provide good acceleration, even when you've got the whole family aboard, but the diesel isn't refined enough. Just a dab on the throttle causes it to bark and grumble.

We'd go for the much quieter petrol then, despite it being rather thirsty. There's a choice of five-speed manual and smooth-shifting four-speed automatic gearboxes for the petrol, while the diesel is only available with the manual.

Even the entry-level Classic trim has climate control, a CD player, keyless entry, alloy wheels and eight airbags - enough to make the more expensive trims redundant. But, for the record, Equippe versions add stability control and luxuries like twin sunroofs, a CD changer and cruise control, while Elegance features leather upholstery as well.

Topping off the range is the 'bling' Warrior model. This is distinguished by its deep mesh front grille and mammoth 18-inch alloys, and it comes with a DVD player so you can keep the kids entertained on long trips.

Trade view

James Ruppert

A fair number around now most are 2.4 Elegance with big spec

James Ruppert
Used car guru

Opt for our favoured 2.4-litre petrol model and fuel bills will be high. Officially, the manual returns 30.1mpg on the official combined cycle and the auto just 28.1mpg, but you're unlikely to match those figures. When we ran a Grandis on our long-term fleet, it fell short of the official figure. Unsurprisingly the diesel performs much better, with a 42.8mpg average.

Residual values are reasonable for the class, though not exceptional, so a used Grandis shouldn't be more expensive to buy than its main rivals, and it's a similar story when it comes to insurance. All models fall into group 13 or 14.

When it's time to service your car, official Mitsubishi dealers typically undercut their Toyota counterparts but charge more per hour than the likes of Nissan. You can save big money by shopping around, however. According to data from Warranty Direct, independent Mitsubishi specialists are among the cheapest out there.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Rare on the used market but 2.0 DiD best model. 2.4 Auto very thirsty

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

The Grandis was only introduced in 2004, so it's too early to pass judgement on its reliability or let you know what's most likely to go wrong.

That said, the signs are encouraging if you look at Mitsubishi's past record. It has consistently had low failure rates and been one of the top 10 manufacturers in our reliability surveys, despite having some of the oldest cars featured.

Less impressive is Mitsubishi's customer satisfaction record. While the annual JD Power Satisfaction Survey provides further proof of the good mechanical reliability of Mitsubishi models, owner feedback in recent years suggests interior quality and the facilities and service at dealers are below par.

Mitsubishi dealers also take longer than average to carry out repairs, pushing up bills when things go wrong.

Trade view

James Ruppert

A fair number around now most are 2.4 Elegance with big spec

James Ruppert
Used car guru
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