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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For The Qashqai's supple ride, capable handling and spacious cabin make it great for the school run and motorway travel. Great safety record

Against Restricted rear headroom and poor resale values. Some rivals are better to drive

Verdict Verdict An imaginative approach to smaller hatchbacks, the quirky Qashqai is great for younger families

Go for… 1.6 Visia

Avoid… 2.0 Tekna

Nissan Qashqai Crossover
  • 1. The extra height does mean there's some body lean through corners, but there is plenty of grip and the steering is well-weighted.
  • 2. The standard Qashqai can seat five, although shoulder room may be tight in the back. If you need to carry more passengers, look for a +2 version, which has two extra seats in the boot.
  • 3. The 113bhp 1.6-litre petrol engine needs to be pushed hard, while the 139bhp 2.0-litre is smooth and responsive. The 104bhp 1.5-litre diesel handles the car's weight well, while the 148bhp 2.
  • 4. Resale values are lower than that of rivals', but that also means you get more for your money when you buy on the used market.
  • 5. The biggest complaint from owners is a knocking noise from the rear of the car. The culprit is usually a problem with the rear shock absorbers, and means they may need replacing
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Nissan Qashqai Crossover full review with expert trade views

The Nissan Quashqai is really a small family car in disguise. It takes a different approach to those of its rivals, such as the Ford Focus and Volkswagen Golf, by sitting taller and having more ground clearance. The result is plenty of cabin space, a generous boot, and a commanding view.

The extra height does mean there's some body lean through corners, but there is plenty of grip and the steering is well-weighted. The suspension handles bumps competently, and you're more than adequately insulated from wind and road noise.

The Qashqai has a solid and durable feel, yet it's also classy, with soft-touch materials and a superb finish. The driving position is good, and the all the seats are supportive. The Nissan also scores well in Euro NCAP crash tests.

Trade view

Unless you intend to drive in treacherous conditions, there's no point considering the four-wheel-drive models: the standard car manages well enough.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The standard Qashqai can seat five, although shoulder room may be tight in the back. If you need to carry more passengers, look for a +2 version (from 2008 onwards), which has two extra seats in the boot. It's longer than the standard car and the extra seats fold into the boot floor when not in use.

As a range, the Qashqai is well equipped, with air-con, alloy wheels, electric windows and Bluetooth connectivity on every model. Move up from the entry-level Visia to the Acenta and you'll also get climate control, a CD multichanger and parking sensors. Range-topping Tekna models get full leather trim and panoramic glass roof.

The 113bhp 1.6-litre petrol engine needs to be worked hard, while the 139bhp 2.0 is smooth and responsive. The 1.5-litre diesel develops 104bhp and handles the car's weight well, while the 148bhp 2.0 diesel has plenty of pull, which suits the +2 version. Four-wheel drive is available only with both 2.0-litre engines, as is the +2 model. An automatic gearbox is an option on the 2.0 petrol car.

Trade view

Petrol models are cheapest on the used market, with the 1.6-litre great value. Visia models give all that you need.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The 1.5-litre diesel Qashqai gives an average of 52.3mpg, while the 1.6-litre petrol manages 42.2mpg. The diesel models hold their value better, but unless you intend to cover enough miles to offset the extra outlay and the higher-cost of diesel, a petrol model might be the cheaper option in the long term.

The Qashqai starts at insurance group 5, working its way up to group 10, so premiums shouldn't be too bad. Franchised dealer servicing costs are noticeably higher than for a Ford Focus or Volkswagen Golf, so you might want to consider finding a reliable independent garage to save money. Nissan has a good reputation for reliability, so the Qashqai should be dependable.

Resale values are lower than that of rivals, but that also means you get more for your money when you buy on the used market.

Trade view

Unless you intend to drive in treacherous conditions, there's no point considering the four-wheel-drive models: the standard car manages well enough.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The biggest complaint from owners is a knocking noise from the rear of the car. The culprit is usually the rear shock absorbers, which may need to be replaced. Fortunately it's a problem that Nissan acknowledges and should be sorted under warranty.

Several owners have also had clutch problems, reporting smoke and a strong burning smell. The issue can be fixed, but dealers have been known to take more than one attempt to cure it.

Squeaks and rattles can appear - especially round the dashboard and front seats. There are complaints about poorly fitted door trim, too.

If the car smells musty or damp, there may be a leak around the edge of the windscreen. Having new glass fitted is the only way to solve the problem.

Trade view

Petrol models are cheapest on the used market, with the 1.6-litre great value. Visia models give all that you need.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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