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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For Cheap but very cheerful. More safety kit than rivals

Against Ride and refinement are poor, and the car isn't hugely practical

Verdict It's very capable in the city, but doesn’t embarrass itself out of it

Go for… 1.0-litre petrol Urban 3dr

Avoid… 1.0-litre petrol Sport 5dr

Peugeot 107 Hatchback
  • 1. There’s just one trim level that comes with an MP3-ready CD stereo, central locking and stability control
  • 2. A tank of fuel should be good for around 470 miles
  • 3. Rear space is tight and the boot is tiny
  • 4. The five-door is much easier to get passengers into, but the three-door will be a bit cheaper to buy
  • 5. Routine servicing is extremely cheap
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Peugeot 107 Hatchback full review with expert trade views

The appeal of city cars such as the Peugeot 107 is often budget-based, so safety kit can be sacrificed as a result. Since many of these cars will be bought by or for young drivers, this can be a worry.

The Peugeot 107 is a bit different. As well as the driver and passenger airbags that come as standard on most models, it also gets side airbags, and curtain airbags were available as a £200 option, although few used examples are likely to have them. It also comes with a basic version of stability control. These kinds of safety levels outdo most other city cars.

The 107 drives reasonably well, too, with capable handling and a great little engine. The ride is a touch firm and refinement isn’t great, but neither problem is serious enough to spoil the experience. Rear space is tight, though, and the boot is tiny.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Not the same discounts as the C1 when new but won't perform much better used

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

The 107 is only available with one engine, a three-cylinder 1.0-litre petrol that's full of character with a thrummy engine note. It's at its best in the city, with keen, perky performance that's perfect for exploiting gaps in traffic. It’s less capable on the motorway, where the thrum turns to a noisy drone, but the 107 seldom fails to keep up with traffic.

There’s just one trim level, too. The Urban comes with an MP3-ready CD stereo, remote central locking, electric front windows and a basic form of stability control. This sort of provision has the Toyota Aygo and Citroen C1 beaten hands down. Air-con was a £500 option when new, but plenty of used examples will have it.

With one engine and one trim, the only real choice is whether to go for three or five doors. The five-door is much easier to get passengers into, but the three-door will be a bit cheaper.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Lots around now, just the one model, but five-door easier to sell

James Ruppert
Used car guru

Even buying these cars new is affordable, so a used version won’t upset your bank manager at all.

The 107 was a bit more expensive than the Aygo when it was new, but consider the extra equipment, and the difference is understandable. However, the Peugeot has weaker retained residuals than the Toyota, so used examples will have lost more of their value, which will even up the prices a bit.

Running costs are minuscule. The small engine will return a fantastic average of 61.4mpg, and this means you’ll be able to travel more than 470 miles on a single tank of fuel.

Insurance premiums won’t cripple you financially, either. The 107 carries a group 1 classification.

Routine servicing is also extremely cheap. A service will cost you roughly the same as it would on the equivalent Aygo or C1, and less than on some other rivals.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Not the same discounts as the C1 when new but won't perform much better used

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

The 107 hasn’t been on sale that long - it was only released in June 2005. Saying how reliable a car this new will be in the long term is tricky, because there simply isn’t enough data to go on. And, for the same reason, we can’t really say which bits are most likely to go wrong, either.

Peugeot usually achieves mid-table mediocrity in our reliability surveys. However, the 107 was built in partnership with Toyota, who did most of the engineering development. This means its reliability is more likely to reflect Toyota's standards than Peugeot's, which is good news.

Toyota has an excellent record when it comes to bullet-proof motoring, and our reliability surveys reflect this year after year. The Japanese firm is always among the front-runners.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Lots around now, just the one model, but five-door easier to sell

James Ruppert
Used car guru
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