We use cookies on whatcar.com to improve your browsing experience and to provide you with relevant content and advertising, by continuing to use our site you agree to this. Please see our privacy policy for more details. Continue

What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For It's got a big, well-shaped boot, and more rear headroom than the hatchback version

Against The driving position is dodgy, the gearshift notchy and the interior tacky

Verdict It's a capable mini-estate, but it shares the hatchback’s shortcomings, especially the driving position

Go for… 1.6 HDi

Avoid… 1.1 petrol

Peugeot 206 SW
  • 1. The cabin isn’t particularly spacious and the interior design is dowdy compared to some rivals'
  • 2. The boot is well-shaped and the SW provides better headroom for rear passengers than the hatchback
  • 3. You’re best off with the 110bhp 1.6 HDi engine, which is powerful and punchy
  • 4. Electrical problems account for almost half of all reported faults, particularly with the central locking system
  • 5. Suspension and brake wear is especially heavy on the higher-powered models
advertisement

Peugeot 206 SW full review with expert trade views

The main reason the 206 hatchback proved so popular was its chic look, but unfortunately, the same can’t be said of the estate version. The cute appearance has been lost in the transition to estate car, but sadly, most of the hatchback’s shortcomings weren’t.

The worst thing is the driving position. Many drivers will find it totally impossible to get comfy because of the odd positioning of the driver’s seat relative to the steering wheel. The cabin isn’t particularly spacious, either, and the interior design is dowdy compared to some rivals.

Then again, it isn’t all doom and gloom. As well as providing a well-shaped boot, the estate also provides better headroom for rear passengers. It’s cheap to buy, too, and if you pick the right engine it’s cheap to run.

On top of that, the chassis is nimble and still manages to provide a supple ride at all but low speeds. However, there's too much road noise and the smaller engines aren’t refined enough at speed.

Trade view

Kurtis Williams

HDI S models have great spec along with performance and economy

Kurtis Williams
Buyer,
Lex Vehicle Leasing

You’re best off with the 110bhp 1.6 HDi engine, which is powerful and punchy. However, this appeared only in later cars.

If you’re considering an earlier model - and if you’re on a tight budget, you probably will be - then plump for the 2.0 HDi. You only get 90bhp, but that’s better than you’ll get from most of the petrol engines in the range, and it’s enough to make decent progress while still giving good fuel economy.

Don’t bother with the 1.1 or 1.4 petrol engines – they’re just too slow. The 1.6 and 2.0 petrols are much better, but the diesel gives more low-down punch and better running costs. There’s also a 1.4 diesel - it’s not bad, but you’ll enjoy yourself more with the bigger diesel.

Low-spec models don’t get that much in the way of kit, especially in early cars, but XT trim will give you all you need.

Trade view

John Owen

Peugeot 206 attributes, but with a bit more load space height. Seems a waste of effort

John Owen
Buyer,
Fords of Winsford

Here lies the 206’s big strength. You can pick one up for peanuts, and the estate version will cost you only a little bit more than the five-door hatchback version.

Fuel economy is pretty good as well. All but the 2.0-litre petrol will deliver at least 40mpg on average, while both the diesel engines will deliver upwards of 50mpg.

Insurance costs aren’t bad. The 1.1 is classified in group 3, and the 1.6 petrol is group 8. Highest is the 2.0 petrol in group 14, but our favourite 1.6-diesel engine is a very reasonable group 6. These classifications are a touch higher like-for-like than other superminis, though.

The 206 SW will cost you a good deal less to service than the equivalent Fiesta, and if you take it to an independent garage rather than a Peugeot franchised dealer the hourly rates will be almost halved.

Trade view

Kurtis Williams

HDI S models have great spec along with performance and economy

Kurtis Williams
Buyer,
Lex Vehicle Leasing

According to Warranty Direct, the 206’s reliability record isn’t bad at all. It's not quite on a par with a Ford Fiesta or Vauxhall Corsa of the same age, but it’s well above average.

Electrical problems account for almost half of all reported faults, and much of this will be down to a dodgy central locking system that packs up on a lot of cars.

If you do take a chance on the 1.1 - and we suggest you don’t - watch out for the catalytic converter, as it’s prone to problems. Suspension and brake wear also seem to be especially heavy on the higher powered models, including the diesels.

Peugeot issued a number of recalls for various faults on the 206. A list of these can be found on the VOSA (Vehicle and Operator Services Agency) website at www.vosa.gov.uk.

Trade view

John Owen

Peugeot 206 attributes, but with a bit more load space height. Seems a waste of effort

John Owen
Buyer,
Fords of Winsford
Haymarket Logo What Car? is brought to you by Haymarket Consumer Media
What Car? is part of Haymarket Motoring
© Haymarket Media Group 2014