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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For It's an affordable coupe-cabriolet with a fancy folding glass and metal roof

Against The extra weight of that roof takes its toll on performance and handling

Verdict It's good value for money and good looking, but it can be unreliable

Go for… The diesel

Avoid… 1.6-litre automatic

Peugeot 307 CC
  • 1. There are reports of lots of little faults, mainly electrics-related. Check every switch works before you buy
  • 2. The diesel engine has the most pulling power and, of all the CC's engines, is best suited to the car
  • 3. A complete service history is always important, especially on the diesel cars
  • 4. Unlike in some convertibles, the back seats in the 307 are useable, even if legroom is limited
  • 5. As in all cars of this type, the 307 CC's boot space is reduced when the roof is down, but not by too much in this case
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Peugeot 307 CC full review with expert trade views

Following on from the popularity of the Peugeot 306 convertible, and the successful folding metal and glass roof on the 206 CC, came the handsome 307 CC.

Sadly, the added weight of that natty roof works against performance and handling. And, while the car drives well enough and can be quite good fun, it’s more of a cruiser than a racer. To its credit, even with the roof down, the body is fairly stiff and there’s minimum wind noise. But, with the roof up, road and engine noise are noticeable.

Unlike some coupe-cabrios, the 307 CC has four usable seats, and adults can fit into the rear seats, but the legroom is limited if there are tall occupants up front. Like all cars of its type, though, boot space is reduced when the roof is down, but the 307’s is not unreasonable. Generally, build quality is good and the materials feel sturdy and well assembled.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Holds its own in the used market. Not as pretty as rivals

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

Most importantly, the range received some minor alterations is 2005, designed to improve reliability, so go for one of those if you can afford it.

There are four engines to choose from, starting off with a 110bhp 1.6-litre petrol unit, and including two 2.0-litre petrols (with 138bhp and 180bhp). Then, from 2005 a 136bhp 2.0-litre diesel option was also available.

In reality, the 1.6 petrol engine is not really up to pulling such a heavy car, and even the 2.0-litre petrols don’t feel particularly quick, especially with the automatic gearbox, which is available with the 138bhp petrol only. As a result, the diesel, which has the most pulling power, is best suited to the CC’s more laidback driving style.

Equipment levels are good, and all models come with alloy wheels, climate control and a CD player, as well as electric operation for the roof, windows and mirrors. The most powerful model has part-leather trim and a CD multichanger. Desirable options to look out for include full leather trim and sat-nav.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Strong demand for CC keeps values firm, 2.0 138bhp better for retail

James Ruppert
Used car guru

The 307 CC is a little more expensive to buy and run than its chief rival, the Renault Megane, but it will probably hold its value better. Try to find one within its original three-year/60,000-mile warranty still intact.

Fuel economy isnt bad: even the most powerful petrol is not much worse than the smallest, but the diesel is the best, with over 47mpg. However, some owners complain of not being able to get near the official figures. Insurance isn’t outrageous, either, with groups ranging from 8 to 14. Again, the diesel scores well in group 11.

Servicing and maintenance costs are roughly the same as the rest of the 307 family, but you can save a considerable amount by going to an independent garage.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Holds its own in the used market. Not as pretty as rivals

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

The 307 hasn’t been as reliable as Peugeot intended and that includes the CC model. There are lots of little faults, mainly electrics-related. The folding roof mechanism comes in for its fair share of criticism, and the interior trim can also cause issues.

This is a car that makes sense to buy from dealerships before the original warranty period has expired. That way you can get them to fix any problems before you take delivery.

Most alarming are the number of recalls on the 307. Some are very serious, including one concerning potential fires in the engine bay. Make sure that all recalls have been carried out. The newer face-lifted cars from 2005 appear to be more reliable.

Service history is always important, especially on the diesel cars, so make sure a potential purchase has stamps at the correct intervals.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Strong demand for CC keeps values firm, 2.0 138bhp better for retail

James Ruppert
Used car guru
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