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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For Luggage space is good; plus, it has a flat floor and a tailgate that opens wide

Against It's not a great car to drive and are too many electrical and mechanical faults

Verdict It looks handsome, but has few other strengths and some nasty weaknesses

Go for… 2.0 HDi 110 S

Avoid… 1.4 Style

Peugeot 307 Estate
  • 1. The boot has a wide opening rear door and a flat floor when you drop the seats
  • 2. Check the mileage shown on the odometer is genuine. Early 307s suffered from a software glitch that meant the odometer needed replacing
  • 3. Ensure that everything electrical works correctly, including the indicator stalks, as these can stick and even snap
  • 4. Engines are reliable and should amass huge mileages with little more than prompt servicing
  • 5. Check for signs of water leaks in the cabin
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Peugeot 307 Estate full review with expert trade views

Most importantly for an estate, the boot area has a wide opening rear door and a flat floor when you drop the seats. However, although it’s big, rivals such as the Skoda Octavia can carry more.

Equipment levels are generous across the range, and the high-roofed cabin is pleasant and airy, so it’s very comfy to sit in. However, it’s not so great to drive, the manual gearshift can feel notchy, and the ride is average.

Once you're on the move, the wind and road noise can become distracting at speed, although engine noise is well suppressed. The diesel engines themselves are fine, but the petrols are no better than so-so for power and economy, while the 1.4 is too puny.

Trade view

Kurtis Williams

Decent size with lots of spec. Build quality questionable. Rapier model is best value

Kurtis Williams
Buyer,
Lex Vehicle Leasing

It's simple - go for a diesel. Peugeot makes good diesel engines but wins no prizes for its petrol motors. First came a 2.0 HDi, providing 90bhp or 110bhp. Then, in 2005, Peugeot face-lifted the 307 and introduced 1.6 HDis to replace the 2.0s. The newcomers produced as much power but used less fuel. If you want a petrol engine go for the 1.6 or, better still, the 2.0.

Estate versions of the 307 provide a choice between just two trim levels. Both have a full tally of safety equipment but the higher S models inlcude the alloy wheels and air conditioning missing from the cheaper Style or (post-face-lift) E models.

Buy from independent dealers specialising in estates for the best value, but don't forget that you can also find one or two keenly priced cars on the forecourts of the larger car supermarkets.

Trade view

John Owen

Station Wagon has better versatility/looks & seven-seat option. Estate difficult to sell used

John Owen
Buyer,
Fords of Winsford

As long as you stick to the diesel engines, fuel economy is good - the 2.0 HDis return 52mpg overall while the 1.6s offer 56mpg. By comparison, the 1.6 petrol returns 36mpg overall and the 2.0 posts 35mpg, although that's impressive for such an engine.

Peugeot has become skilled at building cars that are cheap to repair and this reflects in the 307’s low insurance ratings. Most models fall into group 6, although the 1.4 is as low as group 4.

Diesels need servicing yearly or after 12,000 miles, but petrols stretch intervals to 20,000 miles or two years. The work is simple enough to trust an independent garage with the job, saving money along the way.

The cars lose value rapidly from new, so buying a nearly new car is something of a risk. However, the estate suffers less of a drop than the hatchback, and depreciation slows to a trickle once they're three years old.

Trade view

Kurtis Williams

Decent size with lots of spec. Build quality questionable. Rapier model is best value

Kurtis Williams
Buyer,
Lex Vehicle Leasing

The good news is that the engines will amass huge mileages with little more than prompt servicing, while the transmissions and suspensions are also tough. But, there are plenty of things to wath out for.

First, check the mileage shown on the odometer is genuine. Early 307s suffered from a software glitch which threw the total recorded out of whack, adding miles the car hadn’t actually driven.

Next, check that everything electrical works correctly because problems are widespread. Pay particular attention to the indicator stalks as these can stick and even snap. After that, check for signs of water leaks in the cabin.

As you’ve probably guessed by now, 307s are poor on reliability, and it’s the smaller stuff that plays up with maddening regularity. Small wonder, then, that the What Car? Reliability Index and the JD Power Survey have for years given the 307 a drubbing for its poor reliability.

Trade view

John Owen

Station Wagon has better versatility/looks & seven-seat option. Estate difficult to sell used

John Owen
Buyer,
Fords of Winsford
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