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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For It's stacked full of creature comforts and safety kit

Against Tight rear headroom, and firm ride in town

Verdict It's a comfy, good-looking cruiser which is at home on the motorway, but others do the same job better

Go for… 2.0 HDi diesel

Avoid… V6 engines

Peugeot 407 Saloon
  • 1. If there are rattles in the cabin or uneven panel fit, look for evidence of accident damage
  • 2. The cabin will take five adults, although six-footers might find headroom tight in the rear
  • 3. It's not unknown for the turbo to blow on diesel engines
  • 4. Many 407s will be ex-fleet cars, which is good: they will have been maintained properly and have a full service history
  • 5. If a diesel revs roughly or is lumpy at idle, the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve, a sticky throttle or faulty injectors may be to blame
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Peugeot 407 Saloon full review with expert trade views

Show it a motorway and it will keep you happy all day long. Every engine cruises quietly, wind and road noise are subdued and the ride is comfortable at speed.

Your passengers will enjoy the ride, too, as the cabin will take five of you without too much of a push, although six-footers will find headroom tight in the rear. Being a saloon, it isn't as versatile as a family hatch, but the large boot is family-friendly.

Check you can get on with the driving position – some drivers just can’t get comfy. The sheer number of fiddly buttons on the dashboard look confusing, but most owners say they quickly learn the half dozen or so needed for daily driving.

You’ll notice that the ride isn’t too hot at slower speeds or over broken surfaces. And, the 407 isn’t that much better on twisty country lanes where, despite good grip, it’s far from agile and the steering is numb.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

It didn't take long for the values to point steeply south. 1.6 HDI SE is a good all-rounder

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

The diesels are far and away the better drive. You’ll pay a premium for them, but we think it’s worth it, although we’d steer clear of the 2.7 V6 diesel – it's too expensive to buy and to run. Besides, the 2.0 HDi gives you all the smooth, strong performance you need. There’s a 2.2 HDi if you want a little more oomph and the 1.6 HDi is a good choice for those on a tighter budget.

There are four petrol engines – a 1.8 (you need to work it hard), a 2.0 (our choice), a 2.2 (second best) and a 3.0 V6 (plush, fast, smooth but pricey).

Even the entry-level S models have seven airbags, anti-lock brakes, electronic stability control, an alarm, climate control and CD player, so there’s no real need to upgrade to SE or SV trim. For leather seats, and much else besides, look for an Executive model.

Trade view

James Ruppert

More in the market means lower prices for all models, diesels the pick

James Ruppert
Used car guru

Your bank manager will approve. The initial outlay won’t be too steep because there’s no shortage of supply, so prices aren't too high. Cut a keen deal, though, or you may lose more cash than you expect when you resell, especially if you’re buying a nearly new 407.

You’ll struggle to find a cheaper family saloon to service and, should anything go wrong outside the three-year/60,000-mile warranty, Peugeots are one of the cheapest cars to fix, according to Warranty Direct.

Insurance won’t be a bind either, provided you avoid the V6s, which weigh in at a hefty group 16 or 15. Our favoured 2.0 HDi nets you a group 10-12 premium, depending on trim level, and the 2.0 petrol group 12. The 1.6 HDi and 1.8 petrol are group 8.

V6s apart, all are easy on the juice. The diesels do 46-51mpg and the petrols 31-26mpg.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

It didn't take long for the values to point steeply south. 1.6 HDI SE is a good all-rounder

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

Be more careful with a diesel than a petrol. We’ve heard only isolated reports of trouble with the HDi models and most will have been dealt with under warranty by the time they hit the used market. However, watch out for diesels that rev roughly or are lumpy at idle. Problems with the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve, a sticky throttle and faulty injectors may be to blame. Blown turbos aren’t unknown, either.

There’s no point touching a car without a full service history. There are so many ex-fleet 407s, which will have been maintained properly, that it just isn’t worth risking a potentially neglected car for the sake of saving a couple of hundred pounds on the purchase price.

Peugeot upped its game for the 407 and the good build quality shows it. So if there are rattles in the cabin or uneven panel fit, look for evidence of accident damage, or just walk away.

Trade view

James Ruppert

More in the market means lower prices for all models, diesels the pick

James Ruppert
Used car guru
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