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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For Plenty of style and kit for your money. Good diesels

Against Luggage space is mediocre, and the car feels too slow-witted on twisty roads

Verdict The 407 SW is a distinctive family estate that's practical, if not hugely spacious

Go for… 136bhp 2.0 HDi

Avoid… 1.8 and 3.0 V6 petrol

Peugeot 407 SW
  • 1. The load bay isn’t as big as many rivals’, but it’s a useful shape and accessed by a split-opening tailgate
  • 2. There’s stacks of kit, but all the buttons on the dash can be confusing
  • 3. There have been isolated reports of problems with the HDi diesels. Watch for any that run roughly at idle
  • 4. Injector problems, sticky throttles and trouble with the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve are known trouble-spots on diesels
  • 5. Those in the front have plenty of space, and the estate’s higher roofline creates more rear headroom than in the saloon
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Peugeot 407 SW full review with expert trade views

Never mind outright space, feel the versatility. That’s one of the 407 SW’s main appeals as a family estate. The load bay isn’t as big as many rivals’ but it’s a useful shape and accessed by a split-opening tailgate. The rear seats split and fold to leave a virtually flat load floor, which is probably no more than you'd expect, but to swallow even longer loads, the backrest of the front passenger seat also folds flat - very neat.

Those in the front have plenty of space and the estate’s higher roofline creates more rear headroom than in the saloon. There’s stacks of kit, too, but all those buttons on the dash can be confusing.

The diesel engines suit the car far better than the petrols. Their undemanding low-down response is more in tune with the 407's softer, more comfort-biased drive. Even so, many rivals ride more smoothly, and many more are sharper in corners, too, where the Peugeot feels slow-witted.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

More appealing than saloon but won't perform any better than Laguna on the used market

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

You’ll find plenty of diesels, which is good news. They’ll cost more to buy than the equivalent petrol models, but it’s a price worth paying for their smooth, strong, frugal character. There’s a 2.7 diesel, but it isn’t cheap and you can easily get by with the performance of the far more fuel-efficient 136bhp 2.0 HDi - our favoured model.

If you’re dead-set on petrol, the 2.0 gives the best balance of cost and ability, but the 2.2 isn't far behind. The 3.0 V6 is quick but pricey and the 1.8 too laboured when loaded.

All cars have seven airbags, climate control and a CD player. Most SV models have alloy wheels and a full-length glass roof. The posh Executive gets a CD multi-changer and useful rear parking sensors.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Popular version especially with diesel power and Executive trim

James Ruppert
Used car guru

There are enough used ones around to keep prices keen – and the ever-growing supply is likely to make them even cheaper - so ensure you haggle hard if you’re buying a nearly new example.

The diesels are more expensive to buy, but they’re far more frugal than the petrols, as well as much nicer to drive. Our favourite model, the 2.0 HDi, gives an average of 47mpg and the 1.6 HDi extends that to just over 50mpg.

The 2.7 V6 diesel isn’t so good at 33mpg, and even the 1.8 and 2.0 petrols beat that, although the 3.0 V6 petrol is even worse, landing you with an official average of 28.5mpg.

Service costs are about as cheap as you’ll get for a family estate and insurance is modest if you avoid the group 15 V6 models. The 2.0 HDi is group 10-12, depending on trim level, and the 1.6 HDi just group 8.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

More appealing than saloon but won't perform any better than Laguna on the used market

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

The 407 SW shows all the signs of being the best-built Peugeot estate yet. The company has worked hard to raise the quality on this car and its shows.

There have been isolated reports of problems with the HDi diesels. Watch for any that run roughly at idle or fail to rev cleanly and consistently. Injector problems, sticky throttles or trouble with the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve may be the cause. A few have even blown their turbos.

Don’t touch any car without a full service history. Many used 407 SWs were fleet cars, which means they will have been maintained properly, so there’s no reason to risk a car with patchy maintenance. A proper service record is also essential if the car is still within its original three-year/60,000-mile warranty.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Popular version especially with diesel power and Executive trim

James Ruppert
Used car guru
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