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What Car? says

2 out of 5 stars

For The rear seats tumble and come out; it's refined and has a supple ride

Against The load space is tiny with all seats in place and the build quality is suspect

Verdict It's a decent MPV, but it doesn't offer the quality or the flexibility of the best in the class

Go for… 2.0-litre diesel

Avoid… Petrols

Peugeot 806 MPV
  • 1. Faults with the central locking, immobiliser and air-conditioning are common
  • 2. Six-, seven- and eight-seat versions are available, all with twin sliding rear doors
  • 3. The rear seats are very heavy to lift out, while the interior can suffer from rattles and creaks
  • 4. There's little room for luggage when you're carrying a full compliment of passengers
  • 5. Engine coolant leaks have been known to cause expensive damage
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Peugeot 806 MPV full review with expert trade views

Aside from the badge on the nose, this is, essentially, the same car as the Citroen Synergie. Six-, seven- and eight-seat versions are available, and you get twin sliding rear doors to ease access in tight parking spots.

The 806 also gives owners a massive 3283 litres of luggage space with the second row of seats folded forward and the third row removed. However, there's little room for luggage when you're carrying a full complement of people, so be prepared to travel light on family trips.

The rear seats are very heavy to lift out, while the interior can suffer from rattles and creaks. The dash-mounted gearlever is awkward, too, but at least the swithchgear is logical and simple to use.

As for the drive, the ride is supple and the 806 is a quiet car to travel in. But, if you want something to drive just for the hell of it, you'll be disappointed you're not in a Ford Galaxy and Volkswagen Sharan.

Trade view

John Owen

Almost as sturdy as a wet cornflake box, looks to match

John Owen
Buyer,
Fords of Winsford

The 806 was initially offered with a 123bhp 2.0-litre petrol engine or a 92bhp 1.9-litre diesel. A more powerful 2.0-litre petrol with 138bhp was introduced in May 2000 and a new 110bhp 2.0-litre diesel replaced the old 1.9-litre unit at the same time.

The 2.0-litre diesel is best because it's smooth, has buckets of pull and doesn't become coarse as the revs rise. As a bonus, you get a CD player and cruise control, items that weren't fitted across the range before May 2000.

Still, every 806 is equipped with electric front windows, remote central locking, and heated power door mirrors. Most models have climate control, too, with the entry-level LX trim the only one to make do with air-con.

The standard front airbags are welcome, but disappointingly side and curtain 'bags weren't even available on high-specification cars. On the security front, deadlocks, marked parts and an engine immobiliser help to deter thieves.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Impossible to sell except SRD to mini-cabbers

James Ruppert
Used car guru

The 806 holds its value slightly better than the near-identical Citroen Synergie, which is bad news for second-hand buyers. Prices are competitive with most other rivals, though.

Our favourite version, the 2.0-litre diesel, is the costliest, but you'll claw back some of that at the pumps, because it returns a healthy 42.2mpg on the combined cycle. The 1.9 diesel can only manage 34.9mpg, the 138bhp petrol 30.7mpg and the 123bhp petrol just 26.6mpg.

Insurance bills should be reasonable for all models, with the petrol cars sitting in group 10 and the diesels group 12.

Unfortunately, Peugeot dealers have higher labour rates than many rival manufacturers, including Citroen. This can make maintenance and accident repairs a little pricey, although you can save big money by shopping around. According to data from Warranty Direct, independent Peugeot specialists charge about half as much per hour as their franchised counterparts.

Trade view

John Owen

Almost as sturdy as a wet cornflake box, looks to match

John Owen
Buyer,
Fords of Winsford

Peugeot has tended to perform better than its Citroen sister brand in our reliability surveys, but it still has some way to go before it can compete with the best.

In the case of the 806, it's electrical gremlins that tend to let the side down, with central locking, immobiliser and air-conditioning faults the most common. If any of these are acting up when you take your test drive, it's best to walk away.

Engine coolant leaks have also been known to cause expensive damage and Peugeot has issued five 806-related recalls over the years, so check that any recommended work was carried out. For example, some cars built between September and October 1995 needed their ECU replaced to prevent it triggering the airbags at the wrong time.

There was also a chance of premature handbrake wear on cars built between March and July 1998, while the other three all concerned potential brake problems.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Impossible to sell except SRD to mini-cabbers

James Ruppert
Used car guru
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