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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For It's spacious, practical, safe, enjoyable to drive and the diesel engines are excellent

Against The instrument layout is quirky and luggage space is limited with all seven seats in use

Verdict The 807 is capable, refined and comfortable; a genuine multi-purpose vehicle

Go for… Any diesel

Avoid… 2.0 petrol

Peugeot 807 MPV
  • 1. Sliding doors are great, but there have been reports of electrical problems on some
  • 2. The cabin trim can mark easily and is prone to damage, so inspect the interior closely
  • 3. It's not roomy with all seven seats in place, but folding the rear and middle rows frees up huge space
  • 4. The engine's electronic brain (the ECU) can go haywire and is costly to fix if the car is out of Peugeot's warranty
  • 5. Be especially careful looking at cars with 15-inch wheels, which can suffer premature tyre wear
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Peugeot 807 MPV full review with expert trade views

The 807 is a real improvement on the 806 it replaced. It drives better, has more cabin space, is more versatile and has the added attraction of a five-star Euro NCAP crash test rating.

True, an 807 isn’t the prettiest car you'll ever own, but it is refined and enjoyable to drive. The ride is firm at town speeds, but comfortable on a cruise, and the car goes round corners with tidy composure. And, the driving position is good, so long as you get on with the centrally mounted instruments.

All engines are quiet unless worked hard, but you can avoid that problem easily by buying one of the muscular diesels.

The sliding rear doors are a real asset, especially in tight parking spaces, and the cabin has plenty of other thoughtful design features. Luggage space is tight with all seven seats in place, but folding the rear and middle rows frees up a huge 2948 litres.

Trade view

John Owen

Lot of ex-taxis on the market. Respectable vehicle - avoid shabby interiors

John Owen
Buyer,
Fords of Winsford

The diesels' blend of low-rev pull, smooth delivery, better fuel economy and refined hush suits the 807 better than the petrols. Which is handy, because they’re also more plentiful on the used market.

The 110bhp 2.0 HDi turbodiesel won’t disappoint you, but the 136bhp 2.2 HDi is the pick of the bunch. It’s noticeably stronger and virtually as economical.

The 138bhp 2.0 petrol is okay, but no match for the diesels on the motorway or when you’re fully loaded. There’s also a 160bhp 2.2 for real petrolheads, but if you're a petrolhead, chances are you won't be looking at an 807 anyway.

All models come with electric sliding rear doors, six airbags, climate control, CD player and electric front windows, so we’d be happy with the basic LX trim. GLX adds alloy wheels and an alarm; Executive has electric seat adjustment; and the top-spec Executive SE has cruise control and leather seats. Later models are badged S, SE and Executive.

Peugeot dealers have the best ones, but check car supermarkets and MPV specialists, too.

Trade view

James Ruppert

807 petrols struggle and everyone wants 2.2 HDI

James Ruppert
Used car guru

An equivalent Citroen C8 will be cheaper to buy, but the 807 is still a keenly priced used motor and better value than the Fiat Ulysse. The big Peugeot loses value fast from new, but it takes the worst hit during the first year. After that, depreciation is on a par with most other mainstream MPVs.

Likewise servicing costs. Routine maintenance will be about the same as a Ford Galaxy, Renault Espace and the 807's genetic doubles, the C8 and Ulysse.

You’ll save a little on insurance, though. The basic 2.0 petrol and 2.0 HDi diesel are both just group 10, most are group 11 and the worst you’ll pay is for the plushest 2.2 HDi, which is in group 12.

Fuel costs are reasonable, as well. The petrols should cover about 30 miles on a tankful with gentle driving, while the diesels are capable of 40mpg.

Trade view

John Owen

Lot of ex-taxis on the market. Respectable vehicle - avoid shabby interiors

John Owen
Buyer,
Fords of Winsford

The engine’s electronic brain (the ECU) can go haywire and cause misfires, rough running or no running at all, so ignore any car with any of those symptoms. It isn’t a common problem, but it could be costly to fix if the car is outside Peugeot’s three-year/60,000-mile warranty.

Generally, though, the engines are trouble-free, so long as they have been serviced on time.

The electric sliding doors are great, but there have been reports of problems on some. Mostly, the fault is an electrical one.

The cabin trim can mark easily and is prone to damage, so inspect the interior closely for any signs of damage or missing items of trim. While you’re at it, ensure all electrical items work properly, particularly the windows and sunroofs.

Watch for uneven tyre wear, which could indicate suspension trouble (not unheard of). Be especially vigilant on cars with 15-inch wheels, which can suffer premature tyre wear.

Trade view

James Ruppert

807 petrols struggle and everyone wants 2.2 HDI

James Ruppert
Used car guru
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