We use cookies on whatcar.com to improve your browsing experience and to provide you with relevant content and advertising, by continuing to use our site you agree to this. Please see our privacy policy for more details. Continue

What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For It's an affordable way to get loads of space and a decent drive

Against There's minimal kit and security cover, and the car's boxy shape causes wind noise

Verdict It's a family-friendly, flexible alternative to an MPV for those who don't mind the van looks

Go for… 1.4 petrol

Avoid… 1.9.diesel

Peugeot Partner Combi MPV
  • 1. Look out for scuffs around the load bay and rips in the upholstery
  • 2. Plastics don't feel of the highest quality. The glovebox lid is a known weak point
  • 3. The rear suspension is likely to need work after 50,000 miles
  • 4. Pay attention to the sliding doors as some are known to stick
advertisement

Peugeot Partner Combi MPV full review with expert trade views

It's very like the Citroen Berlingo - that's because they are essentially the same car.

Both share the same 'van with windows' look, and offer an astonishing 624 litres of space in the boot, as well as room for five passengers. Both also offer a drive which is surprisingly unlike a van's - sure-footed with comfortably supple suspension.

The high sides mean it kicks up wind noise and leans a lot in corners, but you don't buy one of these to tear up the racetracks.

We'd avoid the 1.9 diesel, which is really noisy, but the other engines aren't too bad unless you work them very hard.

The upright seating position will suit some, and visibility is excellent, but it's not ideal for long journeys. Sliding doors mean access to the rear is simple, and it's reasonably comfortable for three in the back. Where the Combi shines is on the way to the tip or on holidays, thanks to the enormous loadbay.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Practical van with side windows. Very good value and does the job. 1.4 petrol best value

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

The Combi range has used a variety of engines during its history, culminating in 2006 in a sole option, a 1.6 HDi. which replaced the 2.0-litre turbodiesel used previously.

When it was launched, the car was available with either a 75bhp 1.4-litre petrol or a 70bhp 1.9-litre diesel. A 1.6 Escapade model was introduced when the car had a minor face-lift in early 2003. This has raised suspension, foglights and a skid plate to protect the engine, but it's no off-roader.

As far as we're concerned, the best are the 2.0-litre diesel or the 1.4-litre petrol, which is almost as economic as the 1.9 diesel, but much quieter and quicker.

Remote central locking is standard on every model, as is a driver's airbag and a radio cassette player. Revised models got electric front windows, a single CD player and a passenger airbag.

Quicksilver models were discontinued in 2002, but include fixed glass roof panels, rear roof air vents, aeroplane-style overhead lockers and metallic paint.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Retail customers expect diesel versions, but 1.4 is the value buy

James Ruppert
Used car guru

As the Combi is based on a commercial vehicle, parts shouldn't cost too much when it comes to repair (fleets wouldn't buy them if they did). It has more equipment than a Citroen Berlingo, so will cost a little more.

Running costs aren't too bad, either, and servicing is cheaper than for the Citroen Berlingo. Data from Warranty Direct suggests that Peugeot's repair costs are below average, too.

There's little to choose between the 1.4 and 1.6 petrols and 1.9 diesel for fuel economy - all sit close to the 40mpg mark. Much more frugal is the 2.0-litre diesel which achieves close to 50mpg on average.

The 1.6 Escapade and diesels are in group 5 for insurance, the 1.4 in group 4, reflecting the fact that this isn't your typical boy racer/stolen to order car. Residual values might not match those of the Citroen but should be respectable - these cars have proven popular.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Practical van with side windows. Very good value and does the job. 1.4 petrol best value

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

The Partner Combi is built for tough use, and chances are it will have had some, whether from kids, dogs, or those trips to the tip. Look out for scuffs around the load bay and rips in the upholstery. Some of the plastics don't feel of the highest quality, so they may have suffered some wear, or even given up altogether. The glovebox lid, for example, is a weak point.

The mechanical parts are tough, though, and proven in other Peugeot vehicles, but you're still best off looking for an example with a full service history.

The rear suspension is likely to need work after 50,000 miles, as the car may have suffered some pivot wear. Another age-related fault to watch out for is that the sliding doors can start to stick.

In 2002 a recall of some diesels attended to water getting into the operating circuit, which affected engine and brake performance.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Retail customers expect diesel versions, but 1.4 is the value buy

James Ruppert
Used car guru
Haymarket Logo What Car? is brought to you by Haymarket Consumer Media
What Car? is part of Haymarket Motoring
© Haymarket Media Group 2014