We use cookies on whatcar.com to improve your browsing experience and to provide you with relevant content and advertising, by continuing to use our site you agree to this. Please see our privacy policy for more details. Continue

What Car? says

5 out of 5 stars

For For A fantastic sports car at a realistic price

Against Running costs are high

Verdict Looks great, drives beautifully and it's reliable

Go for… 2.7

Avoid… Models with Tiptronic gearbox

Porsche Boxster Open
  • 1. This second-generation Boxster is far more refined than the old version with the roof up
  • 2. You won't be badly blown about when the roof's folded down
  • 3. The handling is amazing on the open road, but you can still pootle around town in the Boxster
  • 4. Boot offers more space than you might think for a two-seater sports car
  • 5. You should only buy a well-loved car, so avoid tired looking ones
advertisement

Porsche Boxster Open full review with expert trade views

Just when the competition was starting to catch the original Boxster, Porsche moved the goalposts and released this harder, faster, better and stronger version.

Porsche said that 80% of the car was all-new, even though it looked pretty similar to the previous-generation model.

The existing engines were modified to produce more power, with the 2.7-litre up by 12bhp to 237bhp, while the 3.2-litre S model was increased by 20bhp to 276bhp.

The Boxster’s trademark fine handling was retained, while Porsche also worked to improve the car’s practicality and comfort. The hood was redesigned and included extra insulation to make it quieter at higher speeds. The Boxster even has reasonable luggage space, with two storage compartments.

This is a sports car that can use every day and it’s inherently reliable, so it shouldn’t let you down.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Tops for holding its value. Mechanical faults rectified from previous model. 2.7 best value

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

The 2.7-litre engine feels fast enough for most people but, if you want more, the 3.2 S model will fit the bill.

In mid 2006, the 2.7-litre was increased to 245bhp, before being replaced by a 252bhp 2.9-litre. The 3.2-litre was replaced with a 291bhp 3.4-litre in mid-2006, and this was given a 15bhp power increase itself in 2009, to 306bhp.

A new six-speed manual gearbox had a positive action and a slick change. As before, however, the Tiptronic automatic ’box blunted the performance and satisfaction of the drive. With this in mind, the 3.2 S with the manual gearbox is considered to be the ultimate version.

In late 2008, Porsche introduced its smooth twin-clutch PDK automatic gearbox, which is both efficient and enjoyable to use.

The active suspension option does improve the handling, but does nothing for the ride quietly, so we'd avoid it.

Trade view

James Ruppert

2.7 ideally with SportDesign package and hard-top

James Ruppert
Used car guru

It’s a Porsche, so if you’re going to do things properly you'll have to dig deep.

Servicing is vital and, with newer cars, it’s best to stick with a Porsche dealer – especially if you’re still in the original warranty period. Specialist independent maintenance is acceptable, as long as they use original Porsche parts. The good news is that the schedule calls for work only every 18,000 miles.

All models sit in insurance group 43-48, so premiums are going to be sizeable.

Fuel economy is acceptable, however, with 30.4mpg from the 2.7 and 26.6mpg from the 3.2. The Boxster’s running costs will be higher that its rivals’, but it’s the best driver's car of the bunch and has great resale values, so it's worth the extra.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Tops for holding its value. Mechanical faults rectified from previous model. 2.7 best value

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

Be wary of a car that looks like it hasn't been loved and cherished. Some owners might be tempted to save money by skipping services or using non-specialist garages, so a full dealer service history is essential on newer cars.

Build quality is first class, so look out for anything that’s less than perfect – it usually means there are bigger issues afoot. Also look for poor-quality paintwork or general imperfections in the body – a sure sign of repairs.

Make sure all the controls and switches work properly, including the operation and condition of the hood. If you're buying from a dealer, make sure that any issues are sorted before you take delivery. If the wheel alignment isn’t spot-on, the tyres wear rapidly and unevenly, so make sure you check before you buy.

Trade view

James Ruppert

2.7 ideally with SportDesign package and hard-top

James Ruppert
Used car guru
Haymarket Logo What Car? is brought to you by Haymarket Consumer Media
What Car? is part of Haymarket Motoring
© Haymarket Media Group 2014