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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For Cheap to run; spacious with a flexible seating system

Against Average handling; uninspired design

Verdict An oversized supermini that’s big on cabin space

Go for… 1.2 TCE

Avoid… 1.6 Dynamique automatic

Renault Grand Modus Hatchback
  • 1. This Grand Modus still has only five seats like the non-Grand version, but there’s more room inside for passengers to stretch out
  • 2. Our pick of the range is the 100bhp 1.2 TCE, which offers nippy performance and decent fuel economy
  • 3. Like most modern cars, the suspension is generally one of the biggest areas of concern
  • 4. Electrical niggles mean that warning lights on the dashboard may be down to random minor faults
  • 5. Insurance shouldn't prove too expensive, with entry-level models starting at group 6, rising to group 11 for the 1.6-litre petrol automatic
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Renault Grand Modus Hatchback full review with expert trade views

This Grand Modus still has only five seats like the non-Grand version, but there’s more room inside for passengers to stretch out, and the boot’s bigger than in the standard Modus, too.

Even some family cars can’t match this Renault for legroom, especially in the back. As in the smaller version, buyers had the option of choosing a sliding rear-seat system that favours passenger or boot space as required. The central seat of the rear bench also flips up, so the two outer ones can slide inwards to create more shoulder room for two rear-seat passengers.

The Grand Modus is entirely reasonable to drive, with a suspension set-up that's aimed at comfort. The body rolls a bit, and the steering is short of feel, but it's well suited to town work.

The Grand Modus gets a full five-star rating in Euro NCAP safety tests, and all cars come with a minimum of four airbags and ISOFIX child-seat mounting points. However, stability control isn’t standard on any model.

Trade view

Don’t dismiss the turbocharged 1.2-litre petrol model, it’s the pick of the range and far more common than the diesel version.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Our pick of the range is the 100bhp 1.2 TCE, which offers nippy performance and decent fuel economy. Other engine options include a non-turbocharged 74bhp 1.2-litre and a frugal, but rare, 85bhp 1.5-litre diesel. If you want an automatic gearbox you’re stuck with the scarce 110bhp 1.6-litre petrol model.

The entry-level Expression trim comes with air-con, remote central locking and front electric windows, making it good value. Dynamique models get alloy wheels, rear electric windows and curtain airbags.

Trade view

A five-seater MPV that’s spacious and comfortable, but not that exciting to drive.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The 1.2 TCE does an average of 47.9mpg, and emits 138g/km of CO2, while its less-powerful 74bhp sibling averages 47.8mpg and emits 140g/km of CO2.

The 1.5-litre diesel averages 68.9mpg and emits just 107g/km but, unless you plan to cover well over 12,000 miles a year, you may never recover the extra cost of the car.

Insurance shouldn't prove too expensive, with entry-level models starting at group 6, rising to group 11 for the 1.6-litre petrol automatic.

Trade view

Don’t dismiss the turbocharged 1.2-litre petrol model, it’s the pick of the range and far more common than the diesel version.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

As with the regular Modus model, the Grand has a decent reliability record, but there are some issues.

Like most modern cars, the suspension is generally one of the biggest areas of concern, particularly in urban environments where speed humps, kerbs and potholes all take their toll.

The automatic gearbox, although rare, isn’t hard wearing, and can need rebuilding. Parts of the electric window mechanism can also break, so that the whole system needs replacing.

Electrical niggles mean that warning lights on the dashboard may be down to random minor faults, but it can take garages time to find the culprit, and the steering can require expensive repairs. The filler cap can also freeze shut.

Trade view

A five-seater MPV that’s spacious and comfortable, but not that exciting to drive.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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