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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For The Laguna is enjoyable to drive, has plenty of grip and a comfortable cabin. It's also well equipped and solidly put together.

Against Its firm ride can be uncomfortable for some, and the GT version makes it worse. Restricted rear headroom is also an issue.

Verdict Distinctive styling gives the Laguna a chic feel. It may not have the best badge on the front, but it's still great value.

Go for… 2.0 dCi 130 Dynamique

Avoid… 2.0T 170 Initial auto

Renault Laguna Hatchback
  • 1. Knee- and legroom is good throughout the cabin, but the sloping roofline will cause problems for taller rear-seat passengers. The boot is too shallow, which limits practicality.
  • 2. Diesel Lagunas are the safest place for your money, because they have better long-term resale values than petrols.
  • 3. Don't be put off buying a high-mileage car if you're worried about warranty cover: a three-year 100,000-mile policy was standard from new.
  • 4. Even though the cabin feels solid there have been instances of bits of trim breaking or working loose. The areas around the doors appear particularly vulnerable, so check them carefully.
  • 5. The quality of cabin materials, and the contemporary design of the dashboard give the Renault an upmarket feel.
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Renault Laguna Hatchback full review with expert trade views

It's the quintessential fleet car, but that doesn't stop the third-generation Renault Laguna offering great value on the used market. Higher than average depreciation from new means you get a lot of car for your money.

Previous models had a stodgy ride, but this version of the Laguna, introduced in 2007, is good to drive, has sharp steering and plenty of grip through corners. However, the firm ride can be uncomfortable on some roads.

Wind and road noise is kept to a minimum – even at motorway speeds.

Knee- and legroom is good throughout the cabin, but the sloping roofline will cause problems for taller rear-seat passengers. The boot is too shallow, which limits practicality.

The quality of cabin materials, and the contemporary design of the dashboard give the Renault an upmarket feel.

Trade view

Dynamique models are most common and come with all the essentials. Those with the optional sat-nav are just a bit more expensive, so make good buys.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Diesel Lagunas are the safest place for your money, because they have better long-term resale values than petrols.

The 110bhp 1.5-litre diesel model is the economical option, but the 128bhp 2.0-litre is the best all rounder. Anyone with a need for more speed should consider the 148bhp or 173bhp 2.0-litre versions.

Go for the 138bhp 2.0-litre petrol model if the price is low enough, or the turbocharged 2.0-litre automatic with 168bhp.

Air-con, alloy wheels and four electric windows are standard on the entry-level Expression. Dynamique adds half-leather seats and cruise control, while the Initial comes with electrically adjustable leather seats, parking sensors and sat-nav.

Renault introduced the GT in 2008, with its four-wheel steering and larger wheels and tyres for a more responsive drive. While the four-wheel drive improves cornering ability the bigger wheels amplify the already firm ride. The Laguna GT is available with a choice of two engine options: a 201bhp turbocharged 2.0-litre petrol and a 178bhp 2.0-litre diesel.

Trade view

You might be tempted with the low running costs of the 1.5-litre diesel, but test drive one first because you may find it too slow. The 2.0-litre dCi 130 is a better bet overall.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The 1.5-litre diesel averages an impressive 57.6mpg, while the 2.0-litre diesels manage between 47.1mpg and 43.4mpg, depending on the model. The 2.0-litre petrol produces a reasonable 35.7mpg, while the automatic version drops to 31.7mpg. The GT models come in at 34.4mpg for the petrol and 43.4mpg for the diesel.

The lower-powered diesel also slots into a low road tax band, with CO2 emissions of 130g/km. The auto models are the heaviest emitters at 210g/km.

Servicing costs are on a par with most cars in the class, although some key rivals, such as the Ford Mondeo, are cheaper. The same goes for insurance.

Don't be put off buying a high-mileage car if you're worried about warranty cover: a three-year 100,000-mile policy was standard from new.

Trade view

Dynamique models are most common and come with all the essentials. Those with the optional sat-nav are just a bit more expensive, so make good buys.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Since its launch in 2007, the Laguna has faired well in terms of reliability, with owners generally pleased with its performance.

However, even though the cabin feels solid there have been instances of bits of trim breaking or working loose. The areas around the doors appear particularly vulnerable, so check them carefully.

Previous generation Renault Lagunas have suffered a number of reliability problems. Axle, suspension and electric faults account for around 60% of all issues and, although the current car shows no signs of being as susceptible, you should still give these areas a thorough examination.

The Laguna is a popular company and fleet car, but don't let that put you off. Most have been well maintained, but ensure that the service history is up to date.

Trade view

You might be tempted with the low running costs of the 1.5-litre diesel, but test drive one first because you may find it too slow. The 2.0-litre dCi 130 is a better bet overall.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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