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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For A used Skoda Superb Estate has an enormous amount of space for both people and luggage, and all at a great-value price on the used market. It's comfortable and relaxed to drive, and the cabin quality is top-notch.

Against The Superb Estate isn't the prettiest car in the world, and it's a shame that the back seats aren't more intelligent in the way they fold down. Some of the diesel engines are too noisy.

Verdict The Skoda Superb Estate provides huge space, but not at a huge price on the used car market. The cabin is classy, and the driving experience is relaxed. Shame it's not a little cleverer.

Go for… 2.0 TDI 140bhp S 5dr

Avoid… 3.6 V6 4X4

Skoda Superb Estate
  • 1. There have also been complaints of excessive tyre wear, so make sure to check wheel tracking and the tyres' tread depth before buying
  • 2. fuel filler cap and fuel flap are flimsy, so check there’s no damage to either and that they function fully
  • 3. There are a few reports of paint coming away on bumpers after four years
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Skoda Superb Estate full review with expert trade views

The Superb Estate’s ride can feel a little lumpy at low speeds, but it improves as you go faster and it feels wonderfully smooth and settled on the motorway, so it's a great cruiser. True, the car feels a little wallowy through bends, but there's plenty of grip to make you feel secure and the steering is accurate.

The Superb isolates wind and road noise really well. You’ll hear the suspension working over bumps, but it’s not disturbing. The TDI diesel engines are the latest-generation common-rail units, so are nice and refined. The petrols, too, are smooth and quiet, but you'll have to push hard with the 1.4.

The Superb's dashboard lives up to the car's name. It's clutter-free, clearly labelled and simple to navigate. The ventilation system is also easy to use and the touch-screen stereo that you get on most models is simple to operate. Two-way steering-wheel adjustment and driver's seat-height adjustment are standard, so it's easy to make yourself comfortable.

As you'd expect, the boot in the Superb Estate is enormous. There are a range of hooks and lashing points for extra practicality, and you can specify a sliding floor that extends over the rear bumper. It's a pity that the back seats aren't cleverer, because you get a stepped load area when they are folded. As in the hatchback version, passenger space is enormous.

Trade view

The cheapest 1.4 TSI is a great-value buy, if you don’t do many miles.

Rory White
Used car writer

The 123bhp 1.4 TSI petrol engine isn't as slovenly as it sounds, but it will struggle to pull a heavy load. The pokier 1.8 TSIs, with 150- or 158bhp, are better, but don't go near the thirsty 256bhp 3.6 V6.

The diesels are popular: we recommend the 138bhp 2.0 TDI as it has plenty of punch. The 168bhp version is stronger still, but more expensive. The fuel-sipping 1.6 TDI diesel models are adequate unless there's a full load onboard.

S trim forms the entry point for the Superb Estate range, and these cars come with all the basics: alloys, air-conditioning, four powered windows, remote locking and a CD stereo with MP3 socket.

Stepping up to SE trim provides Alcantara upholstery, cruise and climate controls, a CD changer and parking sensors, to which SE Plus adds touch-screen sat-nav and Bluetooth. Elegance trim adds xenon headlamps, leather upholstery and rain-sensing wipers.

Trade view

The Superb is cheap compared to new competition, and are holding their value reasonably well used, although there are bargains to be had.

Rory White
Used car writer

Used Superb buyers get masses of car for their money. Fuel economy and carbon dioxide emissions are respectable, and the turbodiesels are impressively frugal.

Our favourite 1.4 TSI model is capable of 40mpg and emits just 157g/km CO2 so is cheap to tax, too. The 2.0 TDI 170bhp 4x4 manages 44mpg, but will demand a higher price on the forecourt. Conversely, prices will be cheapest on larger petrol models.

The 1.6 TDI Greenline II model makes a lot of sense if you do a lot of miles because of its low CO2 emissions, but was introduced in January 2011 so prices remain high.

Some people think of Skoda as Volkswagen’s poor relation, but the Superb makes a mockery of that assumption. It has classy soft-touch plastics on the surfaces you touch most frequently and the build feels impressively solid.

Trade view

The cheapest 1.4 TSI is a great-value buy, if you don’t do many miles.

Rory White
Used car writer

We’ve heard reports of clutches and flywheels failing, but these are rare, as Skoda also has an excellent record in the JD Power customer satisfaction survey, and the mechanicals should prove hardy and long-lasting.

There have also been complaints of excessive tyre wear, so make sure to check wheel tracking and the tyres' tread depth before buying.

Some have pointed out that the fuel filler cap and fuel flap are flimsy, so check there’s no damage to either and that they function fully.

There are a few reports of paint coming away on bumpers after four years, so give the car a through check over and have any rough patches sorted before handing over any cash.

Trade view

The Superb is cheap compared to new competition, and are holding their value reasonably well used, although there are bargains to be had.

Rory White
Used car writer
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