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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For Loads of space in a comfortable, well-built saloon

Against Feels like a big car and can be too wallowy

Verdict All the space of a limo for family-car money

Go for… 2.0 petrol or 1.9 TD Classic

Avoid… 1.8 T and V6

Skoda Superb Saloon
  • 1. The ignition coil can fail, causing misfires, but the problem is most prevalent on early cars
  • 2. Headlamp bulbs are fiddly to change - get the seller to do it if they need replacing
  • 3. Have a full history check done - there are many ex-taxis out there, and the mileage may have been clocked
  • 4. 2.0-litre petrols and 1.9-litre TDIs are the most economical engines
  • 5. Cabin space is generous, and head- and legroom are very good throughout
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Skoda Superb Saloon full review with expert trade views

You get plenty of used car for your money. Those in the back are treated to limo-style legroom and those in the front have even more space to stretch out. Headroom is generous throughout, too, and there’s a massive boot. However, the rear seats don’t fold on earlier cars.

The cabin is solidly screwed together and you won’t find the quality wanting. The layout and weighting of controls are spot-on as well, and there's no shortage of creature comforts or safety kit, either.

The suspension is tuned for comfort and it wafts along nicely on most surfaces. When the road turns bumpy, though, the body control starts to fall apart and the car can wallow uncomomfortably in corners. Behind the wheel, you’re always aware that this is a big car.

Still, the engines are all good and, wind noise apart, the Superb is a comfortable, refined motorway cruncher.

Trade view

John Owen

Diesels in strong demand. It's a Passat but with better specification

John Owen
Buyer,
Fords of Winsford

You’re spoilt for choice. Of the three petrol engines, we’d go for the 114bhp 2.0 petrol. Although it’s not that quick, it’s refined and cheaper than the others. The turbocharged 148bhp 1.8 T ups the pace for virtually no penalty at the fuel pumps, while the 2.8 V6 throws a 190bhp punch from within a silky-smooth glove.

As for the diesels, the 2.5 TDi V6 has huge reserves of smooth, strong pulling power and is pretty frugal given its performance, but it’s a pricey used car. There’s also a rarer 140bhp 2.0 turbodiesel, but the 1.9 TDi models (100bhp to 129bhp depending on the model) are better value, very economical, quick enough in everyday driving and our favourite diesel engine.

The entry-level models wear Classic badges and carry all you need for comfortable, safe family motoring. The bar is raised on Comfort models and Elegance is the plush, part-leather range-topper.

Trade view

James Ruppert

No consistent demand yet, safe money is a 1.9 TDI PD 130 Elegance

James Ruppert
Used car guru

The big-engined Superbs become comparatively cheap used buys very quickly – their resale values are hit hard during their first year from new – but they won’t be that cheap to run. The shrewder option for higher-mileage drivers, then, is to go for the 2.0 petrol or 1.9 TDi turbodiesels.

The petrol and diesel V6s, for instance, are noticeably dearer to service – about as expensive, for instance, as a BMW 5 Series – but the lesser models cost roughly the same as a VW Passat, with which the Superb shares much of its mechical parts.

No model will stiff you at the fuel pumps. The worst beating you’ll get is from the V6 and 1.8 T petrols (34mpg), but the 1.9 TDi models can nudge 50mpg. Insurance ranges from the group 8 of the 2.0 petrol up to 15 for the 2.8 V6.

Trade view

John Owen

Diesels in strong demand. It's a Passat but with better specification

John Owen
Buyer,
Fords of Winsford

The Superb is generally very sturdy, but you need to be a bit more cautious with the 1.8 T model, particularly on early cars. It can suffer ignition coil failure, which may cause it to misfire and eventually break down. We’ve also heard some reports of the climate control unit giving trouble, so give all the electrical kit a good check, too.

Don’t forget to see that the headlamps work. It's not a deal breaker, of course, but the front bulbs are fiddly and time-consuming to replace on a Superb – get the seller to do it.

The Superb makes a fine minicab, so watch out for any ex-taxis that have had their mileage tampered with or been used too hard. With servicing, though, high mileage should be no problem, so a full service history is essential.

Trade view

James Ruppert

No consistent demand yet, safe money is a 1.9 TDI PD 130 Elegance

James Ruppert
Used car guru
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