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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For Funky looks; decent to drive; reliable

Against Short on refinement; passenger and boot space

Verdict A great little car to buy and own

Go for… 1.0-litre Plus

Avoid… 1.4-litre diesel

Toyota Aygo Hatchback
  • 1. The boot is minuscule and awkward to load
  • 2. Head- and legroom in the back are both in short supply
  • 3. Fuel economy is excellent - even the petrol returns an average of 61.4 mpg
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Toyota Aygo Hatchback full review with expert trade views

The Toyota Aygo is relatively cheap to buy, very cheap to insure and has enough style to appeal to the iPod generation.

The Aygo drives and handles reasonably well, as long as you don’t push it too hard when cornering. The ride is firm, but it shouldn’t upset occupants too much.

Toyota's tiny Aygo is definitely at its best in the city, where its compact dimensions and perky engines make it ideal for zipping through crowded streets. However, replacing city streets with faster A roads and motorways will see a significant drop in refinement.

It isn’t the most practical car, either. The boot is minuscule and awkward to load, and the rear seats are short on both head- and legroom.

Trade view

Don’t spend much time looking for a diesel Aygo – they’re incredibly rare on the used market, and not substantially better than the petrol versions

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Both three and five-door versions are available, but the latter has proved more popular with used buyers. Originally, the Aygo was available with only a 67bhp, 1.0-litre engine, but a 54bhp 1.4-litre diesel was introduced at the beginning of 2006. However, there’s was little demand for the new engine and it was dropped from the range in June 2007. As a result they’re hard to come by on the used market.

The entry-level Aygo is sparsely equipped, but does include a CD player and two airbags as standard. The Aygo+ model gets ISOFIX child seat fittings, electric front windows, two more airbags, remote central locking and an upgraded stereo. The Sport edition has alloy wheels, but was discontinued in May 2007.

New Black and Blue editions replaced the sport, and included unique paint and alloy wheel options, and could be ordered with extras such as a Bluetooth mobile phone system. The optional semi-automatic gearbox is easy enough to live with once you get used to it.

The Aygo underwent a subtle face-lift in early 2009, with a new front bumper and grille, and revised rear lights.

Trade view

Small and perfectly formed, the tiny Toyota should be on every young driver’s shopping list.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

It might cost a little more to buy than similar-sized cars of the same age, because the Aygo’s funky looks and desirability mean its resale values remain strong.

Running costs are where the big savings are made. Both engines carry a group 1 insurance rating, so premiums will be low.

Fuel economy is excellent, too. The petrol returns an average of 61.4mpg, and the diesel is even better – with an average of 68.9mpg. Servicing will also cost you less than it will for most other city cars.

The Toyota generally performs well in reliability and satisfaction surveys, so there shouldn’t be many big repair bills.

Trade view

Don’t spend much time looking for a diesel Aygo – they’re incredibly rare on the used market, and not substantially better than the petrol versions

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The Aygo continues Toyotas reputation for reliable cars, but there are a small number of common faults.

Some cars become reluctant to start and dealers can’t always find the reason. Extremely cold weather brings the problem on, and changing the starter motor can help, but doesn’t always cure the problem.

The clutch can also fail earlier than expected, due to corrosion. A recall to solve the problem fits modified parts, and the rear brakes can need replacing early, too.

Water can leak into the car’s boot, due to poorly fitted weather seals, and the same problem befalls the front footwell due to a faulty vent. Look for damp patches or excess condensation. The boot lock can also fail, through wear and tear.

The Aygo was recalled in early 2010 due to sticking accelerator pedals, as part of a global issue with Toyota cars.

Trade view

Small and perfectly formed, the tiny Toyota should be on every young driver’s shopping list.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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