We use cookies on whatcar.com to improve your browsing experience and to provide you with relevant content and advertising, by continuing to use our site you agree to this. Please see our privacy policy for more details. Continue

What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For Good to drive and good to look at

Against Suffers from restricted rear headroom

Verdict A fast and stylish coupe that's also practical

Go for… 1.4 TSI 2dr

Avoid… none

Volkswagen Scirocco Coupe
  • 1. All Sciroccos come with alloys, air-con, stability control, side and curtain airbags, a CD multichanger and automatic lights and wipers
  • 2. The hardcore R version is the ultimate Scirocco, with a tuned 261bhp 2.0-litre petrol engine. It's fast, but still refined and superb to drive.
  • 3. All cars are available with either a six-speed manual gearbox or VW's slick semi-automatic DSG system with paddleshift.
  • 4. There has also been an issue with the boot mechanism on early cars, because the gas-filled support struts can fail. However, dealers should replace these under warranty.
  • 5. A great-looking coupe and great to drive, but it falls short of a hatchback if you need space and convenience.
advertisement

Volkswagen Scirocco Coupe full review with expert trade views

Twenty eight years after the original Scirocco made its debut, this next-generation version was released to high acclaim. Distinctive styling, a great chassis and a hint of practicality make it a serious alternative for those considering a hot hatch.

Whatever speed it's doing, the Scirocco is hugely impressive. The handling is neutral and there's loads of grip. Drivers can personalise the ride by changing settings that control the suspension, steering and throttle response.

However, it's not just about dynamics, because the VW is also a stylish car that's well put together using quality materials. The cabin is cleverly thought out and distinctive – meaning you won't be left feeling as if you're just driving a Golf derivative.

The driving position should suit most people, and there's plenty of forward passenger space. The two rear-seats have limited headroom, but there's respectable legroom for this type of car. The boot is just about big enough to be of use, and the rear seats fold down when extra space is required.

Trade view

The 1.4-litre models are proving highly popular on the used market, so you might find the diesels are a cheaper option.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Petrolheads might turn up their nose at the 1.4-litre TSI model, but – with 148bhp on tap – it's worth a test drive. There's also a 120bhp version as a lower-powered alternative, while the 208bhp 2.0-litre petrol will satisfy the need for speed.

Alternatively, there's a 2.0-litre TDI diesel with either 138bhp or 168bhp. The more powerful version is noticeably faster.

All Sciroccos come with alloys, air-con, stability control, side and curtain airbags, a CD multichanger and automatic lights and wipers. GT trim models add climate control, upgraded alloys, foglights and numerous styling and equipment tweaks in the cabin.

The hardcore R version is the ultimate Scirocco, with a tuned 261bhp 2.0-litre petrol engine. It's fast, but still refined and superb to drive. However, it does command a heavy financial premium.

All cars are available with either a six-speed manual gearbox or VW's slick semi-automatic DSG system with paddleshift.

Trade view

A great-looking coupe and great to drive, but it falls short of a hatchback if you need space and convenience.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The Scirocco's low weight and clever engine technology keep emissions down. The two 1.4-litre versions produce 146g/km and 154g/km of CO2, while the 2.0-litre petrol produces 172g/km. Even the R comes in at a respectable 189g/km. Annual road tax will be cheaper as a result.

The two diesels produce 134g/km or 138g/km. The semi-auto DSG gearboxes are more efficient that the manual 'box, so automatic models are ever so slightly greener.

It's the same story with fuel economy, the diesels save you the most time and money at the pumps – their official averages come in at 55.4mpg and 53.3mpg depending on power. The petrols give between 44.1mpg and 34.9mpg.

Maintaining a Scirocco will cost more than running an aquivalent VW Golf, but this isn't to say it's expensive. Insurance starts at group 28 for the least powerful petrol, rising through to the R in group 34.

Trade view

The 1.4-litre models are proving highly popular on the used market, so you might find the diesels are a cheaper option.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

o far, the Scirocco has a decent reliability record.

Most reports concern rattles and squeaks from the boot and windows. Window rattles are the hardest to fix.

There has also been an issue with the boot mechanism on early cars, because the gas-filled support struts can fail. However, dealers should replace these under warranty.

There have also been a few reports of problems when connecting MP3 players to the stereo.

Trade view

A great-looking coupe and great to drive, but it falls short of a hatchback if you need space and convenience.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
Haymarket Logo What Car? is brought to you by Haymarket Consumer Media
What Car? is part of Haymarket Motoring
© Haymarket Media Group 2014