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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For High-class image and fancy folding roof make the C70 a desirable drop top.

Against Not the best to drive, and the steering lacks real feel. Running costs can be high.

Verdict A relaxed and sophisticated way to travel, with a good specification as standard.

Go for… 2.4 Sport

Avoid… 2.5T SE Lux

Volvo C70 CC
  • 1. The Volvo C70 mixes and matches the best bits of both coupe and convertible models. The folding metal roof provides a closeted coupe environment when it's up, but you can drop the top at the push of b
  • 2. The petrol models are generally cheaper, because many buyers look for a diesel C70 in the belief that they'll save money. This isn't necessarily the case: you'll need to do enough miles a year to just
  • 3. It might be best to look out for cars with 17-inch wheels, rather than the 18-inch wheels, which are standard on SE Lux models, because they do the ride quality no favours at all.
  • 4. Problems include brittle cabin trim, particularly around the centre console and armrest area, and a complete electrical failure.
  • 5. Only the diesels emit less than 200g/km with the 2.0-litre at 161g/km and the D5 at 169g/km (193g/km as an automatic).
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Volvo C70 CC full review with expert trade views

The Volvo C70 mixes and matches the best bits of both coupe and convertible models. The folding metal roof provides a closeted coupe environment when it's up, but you can drop the top at the push of button and enjoy the weather.

To call the C70 a four seater is stretching the imagination - because the back seats are big enough for children only, or small adults at a pinch. The boot is one of the biggest in this class when the roof is up, but, as soon as it's stowed, you get a small space that's tricky to load.

In order to accommodate the folding roof design, the C70 has piled on the pounds, making it one of the heaviest cars in its class. While this extra weight doesn't make it cumbersome or hard to drive, it's not as agile as rivals such as the VW Eos, and the steering is short of feel. Think of it as a comfortable high-speed cruiser than sharp sporty number.

Trade view

Make sure you take a test drive with the roof up before you buy a C70. Some owners are driven to despair by squeaks and rattles.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The petrol models are generally cheaper, because many buyers look for a diesel C70 in the belief that they'll save money. This isn't necessarily the case: you'll need to do enough miles a year to justify the extra cost of diesel fuel and the increased purchase price.

The 2.4-litre petrol engine with 170bhp works well, but the 217bhp 2.5-litre version, with 217bhp, feels noticeably faster. The 2.4-litre D5 diesel with 178bhp (available as an auto' only until '08) has plenty of low-down pull. In 2007 a 134bhp 2.0-litre diesel was introduced, but it feels a little weedy.

Sport editions come with alloys, electronic stability control, climate control and a CD multichanger. SE trim cars come with electrically adjustable leather seats while the SE Lux adds a few more goodies.

Trade view

Cruise in style and get the wind in your hair, with a C70. Consider cheaper petrol models if you have a low annual mileage.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The weight of the C70 shows when it comes to fuel economy. The 2.4-litre petrol has an official average of 31.4mpg, but expect that to dip into the high 20s with real-world driving. The 2.5-litre petrol is only just behind at 31.0mpg, with the 2.0-litre and D5 diesels doing 46.3mpg and 38.7mpg respectively.

Only the diesels emit less than 200g/km with the 2.0-litre at 161g/km and the D5 at 169g/km (193g/km as an automatic). Servicing costs are generally slightly lower than rivals, but insurance between group 15 – 17 means premiums may be steep. The C70 hasn't sold as well as some rivals, and while that has protected residual values, they will slip over time.

Trade view

Make sure you take a test drive with the roof up before you buy a C70. Some owners are driven to despair by squeaks and rattles.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

As with other coupe/convertibles, the folding roof can be a major bugbear for owners.

Squeaks and rattles are the biggest issue, ranging in severity from a minor irritation to mind-bending annoyance. Dealers can fix the issue, but it can take more than one visit. Some owners swear by lubrication of the roof's weather seals, but consult your dealer before you do this. The roof can also jam while in use, requiring it to be removed, repaired and then refitted. This takes time and, if the car's out of warranty, could prove to be expensive.

Other problems include brittle cabin trim, particularly around the centre console and armrest area, and a complete electrical failure.

It might be best to look out for cars with 17-inch wheels, rather than the 18-inch wheels, which are standard on SE Lux models, because they do the ride quality no favours at all.

Trade view

Cruise in style and get the wind in your hair, with a C70. Consider cheaper petrol models if you have a low annual mileage.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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