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Used Honda CR-V 2006 - 2012 review

(2006 - 2012)
Honda CR-V (06 - 12)
Review continues below...

Which used Honda CR-V estate should I buy?

The engine line-up of this third-generation CR-V was pretty straightforward. Buyers had the choice of a 2.0-litre i-VTEC petrol or a 2.2 i-CDTi diesel (initially with 138bhp, but later upgraded to 148bhp), both of which came with a six-speed manual gearbox as standard. A five-speed automatic was available as an option, initially only on the petrol.

All models came with four-wheel drive as standard, and even the basic SE models were quite well equipped, with air-conditioning, alloy wheels and all-round electric windows. It’s worth upgrading to the ES version, though, which comes with climate control, parking sensors and cruise control, while optional leather trim helps lift the interior ambience. Higher spec EX models came with leather as standard.

As for the petrol versus diesel debate, the lines are a little blurred. While there’s no denying the power or refinement of Honda’s 2.2-litre diesel engine, CO2 emissions of 171g/km make it surprisingly expensive on the tax front compared with a more modern diesel.

The 2.0-litre petrol, with emissions of 190g/km, is barely any worse off, and while the petrol’s official combined fuel economy figure of 34mpg is well beaten by the diesel’s 43mpg, in reality the petrol can easily be coaxed north of 40mpg in daily driving.

Overall, then, the ES is the model to go for, but do your sums on mileage and fuel costs before deciding on a petrol or diesel CR-V.

Our favourite used Honda CR-V: 2.2 i-CDTi ES

 

Honda CR-V (06 - 12)

Which used Honda CR-V estate should I buy?

The engine line-up of this third-generation CR-V was pretty straightforward. Buyers had the choice of a 2.0-litre i-VTEC petrol or a 2.2 i-CDTi diesel (initially with 138bhp, but later upgraded to 148bhp), both of which came with a six-speed manual gearbox as standard. A five-speed automatic was available as an option, initially only on the petrol.

All models came with four-wheel drive as standard, and even the basic SE models were quite well equipped, with air-conditioning, alloy wheels and all-round electric windows. It’s worth upgrading to the ES version, though, which comes with climate control, parking sensors and cruise control, while optional leather trim helps lift the interior ambience. Higher spec EX models came with leather as standard.

As for the petrol versus diesel debate, the lines are a little blurred. While there’s no denying the power or refinement of Honda’s 2.2-litre diesel engine, CO2 emissions of 171g/km make it surprisingly expensive on the tax front compared with a more modern diesel.

The 2.0-litre petrol, with emissions of 190g/km, is barely any worse off, and while the petrol’s official combined fuel economy figure of 34mpg is well beaten by the diesel’s 43mpg, in reality the petrol can easily be coaxed north of 40mpg in daily driving.

Overall, then, the ES is the model to go for, but do your sums on mileage and fuel costs before deciding on a petrol or diesel CR-V.

Our favourite used Honda CR-V: 2.2 i-CDTi ES

 

Honda CR-V (06 - 12)
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