Honda E review

Category: Small Electric

Section: Costs & verdict

Star rating
Honda E 2020 press pics LHD front seats
  • Honda E 2020 press pics LHD front tracking
  • Honda E 2020 LHD press front view
  • Honda E 2020 LHD press static front left
  • Honda E 2020 LHD press static left
  • Honda E 2020 LHD press static rear left
  • Honda E 2020 LHD press electric connection
  • Honda E 2020 press pics LHD rear tracking
  • Honda E 2020 press pics LHD dashboard
  • Honda E 2020 press pics LHD front seats
  • Honda E 2020 press pics LHD infotainment
  • Honda E 2020 press pics LHD front tracking
  • Honda E 2020 LHD press front view
  • Honda E 2020 LHD press static front left
  • Honda E 2020 LHD press static left
  • Honda E 2020 LHD press static rear left
  • Honda E 2020 LHD press electric connection
  • Honda E 2020 press pics LHD rear tracking
  • Honda E 2020 press pics LHD dashboard
  • Honda E 2020 press pics LHD front seats
  • Honda E 2020 press pics LHD infotainment

Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

The Honda E is not a cheap electric car. It is priced well above the Seat Mii Electric, Skoda Citigo IV and MG ZS EV, close to the Renault Zoe and Peugeot e208, and not far off the Hyundai Kona Electric, Kia e-Niro and Nissan Leaf. This is true whether you choose to buy outright or on PCP finance, and – when you consider the longer battery range of its rivals –  the Honda E looks rather expensive.

Better news, though is that you can charge the 35.5kWh lithium-ion battery to 80% in 31 minutes from a 50kW rapid charger (Honda also quotes a charging time of 30 minutes for the same charge from a 100kW charger). Plug it into a 7kW wallbox charger and it’ll take 4.1 hours to get a full charge, while a three-pin domestic plug charge takes 18.8 hours. It’s compatible with CCS and Type 2 chargers.

There are two trim levels, named simply Honda E and Honda E Advance. Both give you a decent range of equipment, with Advance adding luxuries such as a heated steering wheel, a self-parking system and heated front seats, along with the more powerful electric motor we mentioned earlier. But, as the latter doesn’t make a huge difference on the road, we’d stick with the entry-level trim to keep the cost down.

Both versions come with an impressive amount of safety equipment, including automatic emergency braking (AEB); a feature that doesn’t come as standard on the Renault Zoe, and isn’t offered at all on the Mii Electric. As yet, the Honda E hasn’t been crash tested by safety experts Euro NCAP.

Honda has a pretty good record when it comes to reliability, finishing in 10th place out of 31 manufacturers in the 2019 What Car? Reliability Survey. The Honda E is covered by a three-year, 90,000-mile warranty, with the battery covered by a separate eight-year, 100,000-mile warranty and guaranteed to retain 70% of its capacity during that time. The EV powertrain and associated mechanical components are covered by a five-year, 90,000-mile warranty.

Honda E 2020 press pics LHD infotainment
Honda E 2020 press pics LHD front tracking
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Overview

In being great to drive, as well as to look at, the Honda E lives up to expectations. It's undeniably expensive, though, and its limited battery range means it won't slot seamlessly into daily life for everybody.

  • Distinctive styling
  • Good to drive
  • Excellent standard safety equipment
  • Poor range
  • Expensive
  • Miniscule boot