Infiniti Q50 review

Category: Executive car

Section: Costs & verdict

Infiniti Q50
  • Infiniti Q50
  • Infiniti Q50
  • Infiniti Q50
  • Infiniti Q50
  • Infiniti Q50
  • Infiniti Q50
  • Infiniti Q50
  • Infiniti Q50
  • Infiniti Q50
  • Infiniti Q50

Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

The diesel Q50 falls short of its most efficient rivals in terms of CO2 emissions, so it’s more expensive as a company car. It has comparatively high contract hire rates, too. Poor resale values and high servicing costs mean it’ll cost many thousands of pounds more than most rivals over three years as a private buy.

Considering the performance it offers, the hybrid is well priced as a company or private buy, but non-hybrid rivals are better to drive, and cheaper to buy and run. In addition, both petrol-engined models are also less efficient than the majority of competitors, and insurance and tax will be comparatively high for the turbocharged cars.

All Q50s come with emergency brake assist, six airbags and an alarm. You have to go for the expensive optional Safety Shield pack to get the most desirable equipment, though. This includes lane-departure and blind spot warning systems, high-speed emergency braking and a system that helps prevent collisions when reversing, say out of a driveway. The Q50 got the maximum five stars in its Euro NCAP crash test, although it falls a little short of the adult occupant scores of many rivals.

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Infiniti Q50

Overview

The Infiniti Q50 packs a high-tech and surprisingly stylish punch, but it lacks the overall sophistication of its executive car rivals

  • Hybrid is refined
  • Bold styling
  • Thirsty
  • Noisy diesel
  • Vague steering