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Used Jaguar XF Sportbrake 2012-2015 review

(2012 - 2015)
Used Jaguar XF Sportbrake 12-15
Review continues below...

Which used Jaguar XF estate should I buy?

The XF Sportbrake had a 2.2-litre diesel in two power outputs, both of which produced identical claimed economy figures. The engine was an old one, though, and could be a bit noisier than a unit in a top-flight executive saloon or estate. The entry-level model needs to be worked hard to make swift progress and, even then, it's a bit on the slow side. The more powerful 180bhp diesel is gutsy enough, although equivalent engines in the BMW 520d and Mercedes-Benz E200d are even stronger.

If you can find one for reasonable money, the V6 diesel offers seriously strong performance, even from low revs. The automatic gearbox is impressive enough, apart from its annoying habit of pausing when accelerating briskly from a standstill.

The trim levels offered are SE, Luxury, Portfolio, Premium Luxury, Sport and S. However, we’ve always opted for the entry-level SE in the case of the earlier cars. It isn’t stingy on kit; heated leather seats, cruise control, keyless start, automatic headlights and wipers, LED daytime running lights and rear parking sensors are all standard.

Further up the range, Sport and Premium Luxury cars are fully loaded and both have the same goodies, but the Sport trim adds front parking sensors and more aggressive styling, including black detailing, bigger alloy wheels and a unique bodykit.

Later models featured range-topping S trim, available exclusively with the six-cylinder engine, so it cost quite a bit to buy and isn’t really worth seeking out unless you’re after the most potent motor.

Our favourite Jaguar XF Sportbrake 2.2d 183 Sport

 

Used Jaguar XF Sportbrake 12-15

Which used Jaguar XF estate should I buy?

The XF Sportbrake had a 2.2-litre diesel in two power outputs, both of which produced identical claimed economy figures. The engine was an old one, though, and could be a bit noisier than a unit in a top-flight executive saloon or estate. The entry-level model needs to be worked hard to make swift progress and, even then, it's a bit on the slow side. The more powerful 180bhp diesel is gutsy enough, although equivalent engines in the BMW 520d and Mercedes-Benz E200d are even stronger.

If you can find one for reasonable money, the V6 diesel offers seriously strong performance, even from low revs. The automatic gearbox is impressive enough, apart from its annoying habit of pausing when accelerating briskly from a standstill.

The trim levels offered are SE, Luxury, Portfolio, Premium Luxury, Sport and S. However, we’ve always opted for the entry-level SE in the case of the earlier cars. It isn’t stingy on kit; heated leather seats, cruise control, keyless start, automatic headlights and wipers, LED daytime running lights and rear parking sensors are all standard.

Further up the range, Sport and Premium Luxury cars are fully loaded and both have the same goodies, but the Sport trim adds front parking sensors and more aggressive styling, including black detailing, bigger alloy wheels and a unique bodykit.

Later models featured range-topping S trim, available exclusively with the six-cylinder engine, so it cost quite a bit to buy and isn’t really worth seeking out unless you’re after the most potent motor.

Our favourite Jaguar XF Sportbrake 2.2d 183 Sport

 

Used Jaguar XF Sportbrake 12-15
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