Jaguar XJ review

Category: Luxury car

Section: Interior

Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
  • Jaguar XJ
In this section:
  • Driving position and dashboard
  • Visibility, parking sensors and cameras
  • Sat nav and infotainment
  • Quality

Interior

The interior layout, fit and finish

Driving position and dashboard

Finding a suitable driving position is straightforward in the XJ. Standard equipment includes 14-way electrically adjustable front seats. Higher up the range are seats with even more adjustment (18-way) and a massage function. The controls for the seats are conveniently placed and are easy to understand.

The steering wheel adjusts electrically for both reach and rake. It is studded with buttons, but these are easy enough to feel your way around. Meanwhile, the pedals are well placed, meaning you’re not forced to sit awkwardly.

The system is not as polished or sophisticated as those fitted in any of its rivals. The graphics look a little dated, especially on the 12.3in fully digital instrument panel. Some of the icons are too small to hit on the move, too, and the system can be slow to respond.

You can download an app for your phone to remote start the car, send routes to the sat-nav to follow or check fuel levels.

Quality

At first glance, the XJ certainly looks the part inside. Even entry-level models get plenty of leather, wood veneer and chrome trim. The trouble is that there’s far too much hard, rather cheap-looking plastic elsewhere. Look at the lower parts of the dash, or around the centre console, and you’ll find materials that you wouldn’t get in an Audi or BMW costing half the price of the XJ.