Lamborghini Huracan Evo review

Category: Sports car

Section: Performance & drive

Lamborghini Huracan Evo 2020 rear tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracán 2020 front tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracan Evo 2020 rear tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracan Evo 2020 dashboard
  • Lamborghini Huracan Evo 2020 front seats
  • Lamborghini Huracan Evo 2020 centre console
  • Lamborghini Huracán 2020 front tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracán 2020 right panning
  • Lamborghini Huracán 2020 rear tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracán 2020 front storage
  • Lamborghini Huracán 2020 front tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracan Evo 2020 rear tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracan Evo 2020 dashboard
  • Lamborghini Huracan Evo 2020 front seats
  • Lamborghini Huracan Evo 2020 centre console
  • Lamborghini Huracán 2020 front tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracán 2020 right panning
  • Lamborghini Huracán 2020 rear tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracán 2020 front storage
What Car?’s Huracan deals
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Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

As we mentioned above, the Huracán is a fully fledged supercar, but hasn’t always felt as red-blooded as it might. The Huracán Evo, though, aims to put that right, and does so with technology that includes rear-wheel steering and torque vectoring. Those systems - along with the existing dynamic steering, magnetic dampers, stability control and engine - are all integrated into one central brain, called Lamborghini Dinamica Veicolo Integrata (LDVI). The idea is that the various systems work in harmony to deliver the most responsive Lamborghini to date. 

The great news is that you won’t be disappointed, whether you go for the rear-wheel-drive or four-wheel-drive version.

The seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox is also meticulously well sorted, shifting smoothly and with quick-fire precision just when you want it to, even if it can lurch a bit when engaging a gear at very low speeds. For fast driving, you’ll get more satisfaction from using the steering wheel-mounted paddles to change gear manually.

All Lamborghini Huracáns feature the delightfully named ‘Anima’ switch, which allows you to toggle through drive modes and vary throttle, exhaust noise, gearbox ferocity, steering weight, traction control and – if you’ve added them – the optional variable dampers. Even in the most relaxed Strada mode, the Huracán feels appropriately sharp, but most owners will favour mid-level Sport, when everything steps up a notch and makes the Huracán feel properly incisive.

And, thanks in part to that LDVI system the Evo responds willingly to your inputs, wheras the first generation Huracán always felt like it was trying to keep you safe rather than give you the no-holds-barred supercar experience you get from a Ferrari F8 Tributo or McLaren 720S. Give the throttle a boot mid-corner and the four-wheel drive system – which has been tweaked to be rather more playful – will send the majority of the power to the rear wheels, allowing you to gracefully slide the rear end. 

It never feels like it’s going to bite you like a 720S, though, assuming you show it some respect. The RWD model, though, needs to be approached with caution; with all of its power going to the rear wheels all of the time, it’s easy to get the tail wagging on the exit of corners, and if you’re not quick with your inputs it can quickly get away from you. In short, it feels like a proper, occasionally spiky Lamborghini of the old school. 

New car deals
Target Price from £167,300
Swipe to see used and leasing deals
Nearly new deals
From £349,950