Mercedes EQV review

Category: MPV

Section: Performance & drive

Available fuel types:electric
Available colours:
Mercedes EQV 2021 left tracking
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RRP from£71,645

Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

The sole power option for the Mercedes EQV (Badged EQV300) is a 201bhp electric motor. This drives the front wheels and delivers a 0-62mph sprint of 12.1sec, making this one of the slowest EVs around (the least powerful Tesla Model X takes just 3.8sec). 

Given that the EQV lends itself to situations where zero-emissions is more relevant than speed, that's unlikely to cause a problem. Besides, the EQV doesn’t feel sluggish on the open road, partly thanks to the electric motor’s immediate response to your accelerator inputs. It picks up speed very quickly away from traffic lights and, while it tails off somewhat once you get going, is capable of stretching its legs to a top speed of 98mph.

The ride is not particularly cosseting, and models with the standard suspension feel a bit jittery and unsettled, bouncing along on undulating roads, much like the fossil fuel-powered V-Class. That’s likely to calm down when there are passengers or luggage on board, though. Top trim Sport Premium Plus models get air suspension, which we have not yet tested.

The EQV’s handling is not very inspiring. It’s fine for ferrying passengers around airports, but if you’re a private buyer looking to let your hair down on a country road after the school run, many other EVs are more enjoyable to drive. The slow-witted steering and a hefty amount of body lean through corners won’t encourage you to push on and find its limits.

Refinement isn’t particularly impressive, either. Wind and road noise are not too bad but over broken surfaces you'll hear a lot of sound from the suspension, which is particularly noticeable because of the lack of engine noise.

The brake pedal is extremely firm but it is at least consistently weighted, so it doesn’t take too long to get used to how much pressure is required to stop smoothly. The EQV is capable of regenerative braking, and the effect of this is that, when you lift off the accelerator, the car slows down. You can use the paddles on the steering wheel to increase or decrease the effect.

The EQV has a large battery but because it’s a big, heavy car, the claimed electric range of up to 213 miles is towards the lower end of the electric car market. Cheaper EVs such as the BMW iX3 and Jaguar I-Pace, have ranges of more than 280 miles, while the more expensive Model X can travel up to 340 miles.

Mercedes EQV 2021 left tracking

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