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Over 2000 speeders caught at 100mph or more in 2014/15

Figures released by 41 police forces nationwide reveal that 2169 people were caught speeding at more than 100mph in 2014/15

Words ByJimi Beckwith

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Figures obtained under the freedom of information act reveal that 2169 offenders were caught travelling at more than 100mph.

The fastest offender was caught in Cambridgeshire, and was driving at 156mph. The figures were obtained by BBC Radio 5 live, who contacted 45 police forces with a freedom of information, and received the responses from 41 of these.

Current guidelines set out by the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) suggest that in a 70mph limit, if a driver is caught at 96mph or more will be issued with a summons. Harsher, and sometimes custodial sentences can be given, for dangerous driving through excessive speed.

The Institute of Advanced Motorists’ Director of Policy and Research, Neil Greig, said: "This is a small minority, but the number is too high and driving at these speeds on public roads is highly irresponsible."

Addressing the common excuse that the drivers of the cars didn’t realise the speed they were travelling at, Greig said: "Even the most modern, quiet car is not an excuse to be driving at these speeds. The good news is that these people are being caught, but the number is still too high."

"This isn’t a crime that’s restricted to high-end cars; as cars get more advanced they get safer and brakes are more effective, so high-end car drivers can’t be blamed over any other drivers – it’s down to the choices made by the driver."

"An area which could be improved is the speed awareness course – this new information suggests that there is a need for excessive speeding awareness courses, as fines often aren’t deterrent enough."

Paul Wattters, Head of Roads and Transport Policy at the AA agreed, adding: "Any extra speed makes a crash worse, with the risk of death increasing as speed increases. This number is too high, but it’s obvious that there’s an irresponsible minority who spoil things for other motorists, by putting lives at risk."

"Other than managed motorways, there’s not a huge amount of speed enforcement on motorways. The important thing is that these people suffer the consequences, with income-linked fines and driving bans, but ultimately we need more enforcement, with the recent decline in traffic police numbers.