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5 reasons to buy a Volkswagen Tiguan

The Volkswagen Tiguan was launched this year, and is one of the key cars in Volkswagen’s line-up; since the original car’s launch, 10% of global Tiguan sales have been in the UK

Words By Jimi Beckwith

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5 reasons to buy a Volkswagen Tiguan

The Volkswagen Tiguan is the smallest SUV currently offered in the Volkswagen line-up, sitting below the Touareg. It’s a huge seller for Volkswagen; 10% of the Tiguan’s global sales have been in the UK, and the current model’s list of improvements over the previous car means this should continue.

The Tiguan’s list of rivals is even longer than that of the average small SUV, because the Tiguan’s semi-premium market position. This means that the Tiguan has to fight against small SUV favourites, such as the Ford Kuga and Nissan Qashqai among many, many others, as well as more upmarket small SUVs, like the BMW X1, Volvo XC60 and Audi Q3. Such a diverse group of rivals means that the Tiguan has to display a great array of talents to stand out. Thankfully, it does.

Here are the five reasons why we think a Volkswagen Tiguan belongs on your driveway.

5 reasons to buy a Volkswagen Tiguan

5. Passenger space

Whichever of the Tiguan’s five seats you sit in, you’re very likely to be comfortable. There’s abundant head and leg room, both front and rear, and there are all sorts of optional extras that can make your life that bit more comfortable. As with most five-seat cars, the middle rear seat is less roomy and comfortable than the other two, but it’s also likely to be the most seldom used. Up front, there are lots of handy cubbyholes – including a coolbox – for putting your belongings, as well as underseat drawers for front seat occupants, on SE-trim models and above.

4. Storage space

The Tiguan’s boot is as flexible as it is large, and it’s one of the larger boots in its segment, offering more space than that of the Qashqai or X1.There’s a sliding rear bench, which increases the bootspace substantially (at the expense of leg room for rear passengers), as well as an adjustable boot floor and net partitions on models above the entry-level trim.

3. Safety and security

As a family-friendly car, it’s great that the Tiguan scores so highly on safety and security; it scored five stars out of five under NCAP crash testing, and includes automatic emergency braking from the entry-level-spec Tiguan upwards. The high seating position is sure to attract buyers, too, as is the Tiguan’s impressive resistance to thieves, as evaluated by security experts Thatcham.

2. Behind the wheel

Behind the wheel in a Tiguan is a particularly nice place to be – the dashboard is laid out in typically intuitive Volkswagen fashion, meaning there’s no need for the steering wheel to be button-heavy (something which some of the Tiguan’s contemporaries haven’t figured out yet). The pedals are nicely positioned, with a well-placed rest for your left foot, and there’s plenty of seat and steering wheel adjustment. Just bear in mind that entry-level-trim S models don’t get lumbar support – something you might want if you're planning on doing lots of long trips in the Tiguan.

1. Refinement

Go for a petrol-engined Tiguan and you’ll enjoy smooth progress, even when you really stick your foot down. Diesels are slightly less smooth at tickover, and the X1’s are more hushed, but they’re far from loud and intrusive. There’s next to no wind noise in the Tiguan, with the exception of a little around the door mirrors at motorway speeds, and providing you avoid the bigger alloys among the choices, road noise is almost non-existent.

What about buying used?

It’s unlikely that there’ll be many - if any - current-generation Tiguans on the used market, as it’s not been around for long, but there are plenty of previous-generation Tiguans around. The new model’s release should have driven prices down on these, too.

We thought that the previous Tiguan was a little disappointing in terms of its rear visibility, while it could have been better when taken offroad as an SUV. If you can live with those foibles, a 2.0 TDI Bluemotion Tech Tiguan can be had in SE or Sport trim for Β£13,000-Β£14,000 with 27,000 miles on the clock.

What next?

Click here to find out more about the Volkswagen Tiguan, or to take a look at used examples, click here to browse the What Car? Classifieds

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