Audi TT Mk1 – Rewind Wednesday

The original Audi TT was a concept car made real, and a winner of numerous What Car? Awards. But how does it stack up today?

Words By Alex Robbins

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Audi TT quattro Sport Mk1 parked

You can buy a running Mk1 TT for as little as Β£1000 these days. But before you get too excited, keep in mind that this figure will probably get you a car with mega mileage, or that hasn’t been looked after, or that is in need of repairs – or a combination of all three.

For a good TT, you’ll really want to budget at least Β£2000. That should get you a 222bhp model with average miles or less, a full service history and a long MOT in good condition.

Up your budget to Β£5000 and you’ll start to find tidy V6s, while at this price you’ll also find the very best of the 222bhp cars. If you want the quattro Sport, which is the most desirable version of the TT, you’ll need to pay at least Β£8000 – although Β£10,000 is more appropriate to find a tidy example.

These prices are distinctly reasonable and about as cheap as they’re going to get; the TT is a sure-fire future classic and, before too long, you can expect prices to start to rise. So if you want one, now’s the time.

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The best (and worst) used coupΓ©s for Β£5000

Don’t fancy a TT? Find out what else you can buy for similar cash with our rundown of the 10 best used coupΓ©s for less than Β£5k:

10. Hyundai CoupΓ©

Squint a little and the Hyundai CoupΓ© could almost be one of those 1990s front-engined Ferraris, all shark-like design and the promise of easy performance. In reality, it's attractive rather than stunning, and it drives well rather than superbly. Don’t worry, though – it’s pleasant to punt along, with its accurate steering and decent interior. Even the ride is pretty good, although it can still jar around town. That said, it’s not all good news. The engine is only just powerful enough and it feels sufficiently coarse to be unpleasant on the ear at high revs.

It was well made, though, making used examples a tempting proposition, especially at this price level. Β£5000 buys you a good-condition 2009 car from the end of the model’s run.

We found 2.0, 2009 (09), 26,000 miles, full service history, Β£5000

Read the used Hyundai CoupΓ© review

Find a used Hyundai CoupΓ© in the What Car? Classifieds

9. Renault Laguna CoupΓ©

If you were cynical, you could say the Laguna CoupΓ©, in common with a lot of other coupΓ©s, is no more than the saloon or hatchback version of the Laguna with a more attractive body on top. This is true, but style is a large part of the appeal here and the Laguna CoupΓ© scores not only by looking different from its siblings but also from just about anything else on the road. It drives well, has a comfortable interior and the GT model even has four-wheel steering. Furthermore, a 2011 car is barely run-in, so it’s worth more than a casual look.

We found 2.0 dCi Dynamique, 2011 (11), 79,000 miles, full service history, Β£5000

Read the used Renault Laguna CoupΓ© review

Find a used Renault Laguna CoupΓ© in the What Car? Classifieds

8. Alfa Romeo GT

Now, if you’re talking style, then the Alfa Romeo badge takes some beating. Trouble is, for a long time Alfa had the wrong reputation, with a legendary fragility and cars that were distinctly below par to drive. The GT was a much more likeable car, though. Dynamically, it wasn’t up there with a BMW 3 Series, but it still offered a fine mix of style, performance, practicality and, crucially, enough chassis competence to make it a valid choice. Now, such racing heritage and charm can be yours for peanuts. Worth the risk, we think.

We found 2.0 JTS, 2007 (07), full service history, 46,000 miles, Β£4995

Read the used Alfa Romeo GT review

Find a used Alfa Romeo GT in the What Car? Classifieds

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