Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo review

Category: Luxury car

Section: Costs & verdict

Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo 2020 infotainment
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 front right tracking
  • Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo 2021 rear tracking
  • Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo 2021 interior dashboard
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 interior rear seats
  • Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo 2020 infotainment
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 right tracking
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 front right tracking
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 rear right static
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 badge detail
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 badge detail
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 interior front seats
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 interior detail
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 boot open
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 front right tracking
  • Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo 2021 rear tracking
  • Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo 2021 interior dashboard
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 interior rear seats
  • Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo 2020 infotainment
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 right tracking
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 front right tracking
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 rear right static
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 badge detail
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 badge detail
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 interior front seats
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 interior detail
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S 2021 boot open
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Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

The Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo isn't cheap to buy, whichever model you choose. You’ve probably realised that already, but did you know Porsche dealers don’t do discounts, either?

Our pick of the range, the Sport Turismo 4S, is about the same list price as the Audi RS6 Avant and a bit cheaper than the Mercedes-AMG E63 S Estate – you should get a hefty discount on those if you look at our New Car Buying section. The Turbo models are quite a jump up in cost, and more in line with the AMG GT 4-door.

The entry-level 4 has 19in alloy wheels, dual-zone climate control, leather seats, cruise control, power-folding door mirrors and heated front seats, but you’ll need to pay for extras such as privacy glass, keyless entry and the adjustable lumbar adjustment we mentioned earlier. The 4S is our favourite trim more for the way it drives than any additional luxuries: you get air suspension and better brakes.

The GTS adds a sports exhaust, different styling, 20in alloys, a heated steering wheel and part Alcantara seats, while the Turbos improve on that with a panoramic sunroof, metallic paint, 21in alloys, a head-up display and keyless entry.

In the 2020 What Car? Reliability Survey, Porsche finished joint 22nd (with Audi) out of the 31-strong list of manufacturers. That's just ahead of Mercedes and Tesla but a long way behind BMW in ninth. The Panamera’s warranty period is three years, but it isn’t limited by mileage.

Euro NCAP hasn’t tested the Panamera for safety. You get stability control, ABS, lane-keep assist, traffic sign recognition and the usual selection of airbags, but automatic emergency braking (AEB) is an option that comes only when you add adaptive cruise control. That's disappointing when even most sub-£15k city cars get AEB as standard.

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Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo 2020 infotainment

Overview

If you’re after a sharper-driving alternative to big luxury estates and plug-in hybrids, the Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo is well worth considering. It doesn’t have the biggest boot around, but it’s still quite practical and there’s loads of rear seat space. There’s certainly no lack of performance and it handles very well for such a big car. However, an AMG E63S Estate provides a better blend of space and pace.

  • Impressive pace
  • Surprisingly agile for such a large car
  • Relatively low CO2 emissions from E-Hybrid
  • Expensive to buy
  • Touch-sensitive controls are hard to navigate
  • Boot more practical than coupé’s, but still not vast