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Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo review

Category: Large Electric

Section: Performance & drive

Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 rear left tracking
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 rear left tracking
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 interior dashboard
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 interior rear seats
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 interior
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 right tracking
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 front left tracking
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 right static
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 alloy wheel detail
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 interior front seats
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 boot open
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 rear left tracking
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 interior dashboard
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 interior rear seats
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 interior
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 right tracking
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 front left tracking
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 right static
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 alloy wheel detail
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 interior front seats
  • Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 2022 boot open
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Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

First things first. Does the fact that the Taycan Cross Turismo sits a whopping 20mm higher than the original Porsche Taycan compromise or limit the car’s inherent agility? Well, perhaps a touch. 

In Normal mode, for example, on particularly demanding roads you get a little more body lean in quick corners and a bit more vertical movement over sharp crests than in the standard car. Those body movements always feel controlled and utterly predictable, though – unlike the sometimes wayward Tesla Model S. In Sport or Sport Plus mode, the Cross Turismo is even more impressive.

There's so much grip that you’re unlikely to ever find its limits on a public road, and its steering gives you a much better sense of connection with the front wheels than you get in most petrol-powered performance estates. Every millimetre of movement has a subtle but positive influence on the car’s trajectory, giving you maximum confidence. 

The brake pedal weight is very well-judged for an electric car too. The Cross Turismo puts energy back into the batteries when you hit the brakes, but the interference is minimal so you're never surprised by how the car reacts when you squeeze the middle pedal. 

Most impressive of all, though, is the Cross Turismo’s acceleration. In our favoured 4S form, it produces the same whopping 563bhp as the equivalent standard Taycan and is just 0.1sec slower to 62mph, at a breathtaking 4.1sec. The more powerful Turbo and Turbo S are quicker still. 

In the real world, the response when you stamp on the accelerator is instant, like switching on a light bulb. The way you're pushed back in your seat feels like gravity has flipped to acting horizontally. We’d certainly recommend giving your occupants some prior warning before flooring the accelerator.

So it’s devastatingly quick and effortless to drive, but the Cross Turismo has a final party piece: incredible levels of refinement. At motorway speeds, it lopes along with a relaxed gait more akin to a luxury saloon than a performance estate, and with the optional double-glazed windows fitted, there's minimal wind noise. Few cars are better built for crossing continents at speed. 

Hold on, though... with all that plastic body cladding and promises of off-road ability, can the Cross Turismo really venture off the beaten path? Well, the simple answer is, no, not really.

New car deals
Target Price from £75,055
Swipe to see used and leasing deals
Used car deals
From £97,950