Driving

Suzuki SX4 S-Cross review

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Suzuki SX4 S-Cross front
Review continues below...
12 Dec 2015 09:40 | Last updated: 20 Sep 2018 10:47

In this review

Driving

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

Suzuki SX4 S-Cross hatchback performance

The 1.4 petrol is a strong performer, but the diesel is the better bet. The S-Cross’s 1.0 petrol engine is actually the same as the one found in the firm’s latest hatchback, the Baleno. It’s powerful enough for the S-Cross to feel comfortable in and out of town, but if you want to sprint down a slip road to get up to speed, or overtake in fast moving traffic, it has to be worked hard.

The 1.4 on the other hand is quicker and stronger, so it's perfect if you often venture onto the motorway. It’s also smoother at low revs, introducing less vibration into the cabin. Around town its hushed tones make it a far more relaxing drive than the gruff sounding 1.6-litre diesel.

The diesel isn’t quite as quick in an outright sprint, but it does have slightly better low-down shove, endowing it with impressive flexibility. This makes it easier to drive in the real world, because it will accelerate cleanly without you constantly needing to change to a lower gear.

Suzuki SX4 S-Cross hatchback ride

Unfortunately, while the S-Cross’s body might be well controlled, its suspension doesn’t do such a good job of keeping things settled over poor road surfaces. The suspension reacts harshly and noisily to broken tarmac and potholes, and the car’s body becomes noticeably unsettled, too. As the speed builds, the initial bump absorption gets better, but expansion joints on the motorway still clunk inside.

The heavier four-wheel-drive models are slightly smoother and quieter at lower speeds, as are SZ4 cars with the smallest 16in alloy wheels (all other versions ride on 17in wheels), but every S-Cross suffers the same fundamental problems with its ride. A Skoda Yeti and Nissan Qashqai are more comfortable over UK roads.

Suzuki SX4 S-Cross rear

Suzuki SX4 S-Cross hatchback handling

No small SUV is the last word in handling prowess, but the S-Cross does a pretty tidy job through tight bends, and isn’t too far behind the Skoda Yeti. It manages to keep its body nicely controlled, and the front wheels are reasonably grippy.

Like most front-wheel-drive cars, start to push hard and eventually the front wheels will wash wide. However, when that happens, it’s progressive rather than snappy. All-wheel-drive models have slightly more grip.

The steering is probably the weakest link, because it doesn’t quite let you know how the front wheels are faring under pressure. For the most part, though, it’s precise, consistently weighted and, at lower town speeds, light enough to make parking easy.

Suzuki SX4 S-Cross hatchback refinement

This is one of the S-Cross’s poorest areas, the major culprit being the 1.6-litre diesel engine. It’s noisy from idle and even at medium revs there’s a bit of clatter and vibration in the cabin. Floor the throttle and the noise reaches frustrating levels.

The 1.0 petrol is better in this respect. Press the starter button on the dashboard and the little three-cylinder engine wakes in a gruff manner, but once underway, the engine smoothes out and settles down into an almost imperceptible thrum.

However, the prize for overall refinement goes to the 1.4 petrol. At low speeds the engine is impressively smooth and silent, and even when worked hard, very little vibration is transferred to the cabin.

At high speeds on the motorway, there’s some road noise in those models with the largest alloy wheels, and some slight noise as the wind whips around the S-Cross’s door mirrors. In this respect, the Suzuki is some way behind the best-in-class Nissan Qashqai.

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There are 3 trims available for the SX4 S-Cross hatchback. Click to see details.See all versions
SZ4
This may be the entry-point of the range, but Suzuki hasn’t scrimped on standard equipment. You get 16in alloy wheels, air-con, front electric windows plus a touchscreen infotainment system with a...View trim
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SZ-T
We’d recommend opting for the SZ-T trim, as it gets the integrated sat-nav and media system, as well as automatic air-con, keyless entry, 17in alloy wheels and a rear parking camera. These upgrades...View trim
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SZ5
This features lots of upmarket upgrades including leather seats, a panoramic sunroof, adaptive cruise control and a better sound system. It’s not an overly expensive upgrade but it’s not a necessar...View trim
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