Toyota C-HR review

Category: Family SUV

Section: Introduction

Toyota C-HR 2022 front right tracking
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 front right tracking
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 rear right cornering
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 interior dashboard
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 interior rear seats
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 interior front seats
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 interior infotainment detail
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 rear right tracking
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 headlight detail
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 alloy wheel detail
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 boot open
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 front right tracking
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 rear right cornering
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 interior dashboard
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 interior rear seats
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 interior front seats
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 interior infotainment detail
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 rear right tracking
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 headlight detail
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 alloy wheel detail
  • Toyota C-HR 2022 boot open
What Car?’s C-HR deals
New car deals
Save up to £2,274
Target Price from £27,556
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or from £278pm
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From £313pm

Introduction

What Car? says...

The Toyota C-HR occupies a slot in the Japanese firm's line-up that was unfilled for a surprisingly long time. It's similar in size to the Nissan Qashqai – the car that seems to get all the accolades for kicking off the family SUV craze.

Giving all the glory to the Qashqai is a bit unfair, actually, because the Toyota RAV4 got us interested in family SUVs more than a decade earlier, but over the years the RAV4 has grown into a quite large and expensive beast. In effect, the C-HR, which is now available only in hybrid form, fills the shoes handed down by the RAV4 as it evolved.

Read on over the next few pages of this review and we'll tell you how the Toyota C-HR squares up against its main family SUV rivals – including the Nissan QashqaiSeat Ateca and Skoda Karoq – in all the important areas. We'll also explain which engines and trims make the most sense and suggest the options you might want to consider stumping up for.

If you do decide it's the car for you, don't forget that you could get a big discount without the hassle of haggling by checking out the best prices using the free What Car? New Car Buying service, where you'll find some excellent new family SUV deals.

FAQs

  • The Toyota C-HR finished 11th out of 28 family SUVs rated in the 2021 What Car? Reliability Survey. That’s a strong result, but a little behind Toyota’s average: the brand finished joint fifth (with Mini) out of 30 brands rated overall. The C-HR is sold with a five-year/100,000-mile warranty, which compares favourably with the three years/60,000 miles of most rivals. Read more here

  • The Toyota C-HR is only available as a hybrid car, and buyers can choose between a battery-assisted 1.8 or 2.0-litre engine. Both use hybrid technology to deliver strong fuel economy. If you want a similar-sized fully electric car from the brand, there’s the Toyota bZ4X. Read more here

  • Our pick of the range is the entry-level model, the Toyota C-HR Icon powered by a 1.8-litre hybrid engine. The lowest trim level comes with lots of kit, including 17in alloy wheels, an 8.0in touchscreen, a reversing camera and LED headlights. The less powerful engine is not particularly fast, but it’s quick enough, economical and significantly cheaper than the 2.0-litre. Read more here

  • Toyota’s Icon trim level is its entry-level specification, but on the C-HR it still includes a generous kit list, including a suite of safety equipment and some features such as alloy wheels that some rivals would charge extra for. Design takes you one step further up the pecking order, and adds nice-to-have options such as heated seats, automatic wipers and a self-parking feature. Read more here

  • The Toyota C-HR received a full five-star ranking from safety experts Euro NCAP when it was tested in 2017 – although it’s worth noting that the tests have been toughened up since then, making comparisons with newer models difficult. A strong suite of standard safety equipment includes lane-departure warning, an automatic emergency braking (AEB) pre-collision system, blind-spot monitoring and an alert that warns of cars crossing behind as you reverse. Read more here

  • The Toyota CH-R’s boot space is a little disappointing compared with rivals such as the Skoda Karoq, Seat Ateca and Nissan Qashqai. Annoyingly, while the boot has a reasonably wide opening, it tapers towards the backs of the rear seats, compromising practicality. There’s no height-adjustable boot floor to help create a long, flat space, either. Read more here

At a glance
New car deals
Save up to £2,274
Target Price from £27,556
Save up to £2,274
or from £278pm
Swipe to see used and leasing deals
Leasing deals
From £313pm
RRP price range £29,330 - £37,350
Number of trims (see all)4
Number of engines (see all)2
Available fuel types (which is best for you?)hybrid
MPG range across all versions 53.3 - 57.6
Available doors options 5
Warranty 5 years / 100000 miles
Company car tax at 20% (min/max) £1,514 / £2,078
Company car tax at 40% (min/max) £3,028 / £4,157
Available colours