Vauxhall Insignia review

Category: Executive car

Section: Costs & verdict

Vauxhall Insignia 2021 infotainment
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 front tracking
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 rear cornering
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 dashboard
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 rear seats
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 infotainment
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 front tracking
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 front static
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 rear static
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 grille detail
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 front tracking
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 rear cornering
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 dashboard
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 rear seats
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 infotainment
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 front tracking
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 front static
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 rear static
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 grille detail
What Car?’s Insignia deals
Nearly new deals
From £29,500
In this section:
  • Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2
  • Equipment, options and extras
  • Reliability
  • Safety and security

Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2

If there’s one thing the Vauxhall Insignia definitely has going for it, it’s cost. The range starts at a similar price to many smaller family hatchbacks, even before discounts. The 2.0 Turbo D looks good value compared to its Skoda Superb equivalent, although the price jump from the 1.5 is pretty hefty. On the other hand, the petrol models are on the pricey side because they’re only available with the high trim levels. That pushes the cost in the direction of premium rivals, including the Audi A4 and BMW 3 Series.

CO2 emissions for the diesels are certainly competitive, especially if you opt for a manual gearbox. That makes them the most suitable models for company car drivers, especially as the 2.0-litre diesel is just as efficient as the 1.5. It’s a shame that unlike many rivals (including the Superb) the Insignia doesn’t offer a super-low emissions plug-in hybrid variant. If you’re looking to kick the diesel habit, the unfortunate news is that both petrol engines are in the 37% tax bracket.

Equipment, options and extras

The entry-level SE Nav Vauxhall Insignia is reasonably well equipped. You get 17in alloy wheels, dual-zone climate control, cruise control and the infotainment system described earlier. SRi Nav is worth considering for its more flexible rear seats and because it offers the option of the 2.0 Turbo D engine.

SRi VX-Line Nav gains leather seats, a wireless phone charger, keyless entry, sportier styling, big 20in wheels and the option of the 197bhp 2.0 Turbo, but if you’re spending that much we’d look at Ultimate Nav, which swaps the styling tweaks for yet more equipment. GSi, on the other hand, is far too pricey to recommend.

Overview

The Vauxhall Insignia doesn’t excel in any particular area, but stick to the lower trim levels and it’s not a lot of money compared to other executive cars. Avoid the petrol models and it should prove cheap to run, although there’s no tax-busting plug-in hybrid model. Just remember that rivals are better to drive and even more practical.

  • Low purchase price of entry-level trims
  • Competitive benefit-in-kind payments
  • Reasonably well equipped
  • Poor rear head room
  • Too much road noise
  • Boot not as big as some rivals